Presentation Title

Stereotyping a Musician’s Race to a Genre

Faculty Mentor

Chara Powell

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 8

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

People often draw from social schemas as a tool to generalize information or form a “mental shortcut”. In many cases, however, this results in erroneous assumptions and stereotypes. The current study used a between-groups experimental design to examine the susceptibility of the human mind to unconsciously stereotype when informed of an individual’s race. The sample consisted of 33 participants (24 female, 8 male, 1 non-binary) with an age range of 18 to 55. Participants lacked ethnic diversity as 24 were Chicano/a Latina/o/x Hispanic. The researchers hypothesized that participants would attach specific types of music to specific racial backgrounds. More specifically, the researchers hypothesized when reading a story with a musical artist of African descent, the participants will associate the artist’s musical genre to R & B or Hip-hop. Similarly, when reading a story with an artist who was said to be Caucasian, participants will associate the artist’s genre to EDM or Indie Pop. It was also hypothesized that there would be a difference between the Caucasian and African artist in the perception of effort involved in their rise to fame. Lastly, the study investigated whether the likelihood of attending the artists’ concert was dependent on the race of the artist. While the hypotheses for genre identification and likeliness of attending the concert were not statistically significant, the hypothesis on perception of effort involved in their rise to fame yielded significant results. Higher scores were yielded for the Caucasian artist as compared to the African artist in their effort involved in their rise to fame. The authors conclude that stereotyping continues to exist even in industries known for being inclusive and valuing diversity. Care must be taken not to cling to cognitive shortcuts at the expense of accuracy and open-mindedness.

Summary of research results to be presented

The current study’s first hypothesis was that participants would stereotype the genre of music based on the artists’ race; i.e. a Caucasian artist to EDM or Indie Pop, and African artist to RnB or Hip-Hop. The second hypothesis assumed participants would rate “how hard” the artist worked for her success based on the artists’ race. The last hypothesis regarded the likeliness of the participant’s attendance to a concert of the artist depending on the artists’ race. In order to investigate whether race affected genre identification, a Chi-Square Goodness of Fit test was conducted with results as followed: x2 (3, N=34) = .79, n.s. There was no statistical significance between the artist’s race and stereotyping her into the genre of RnB or Hip-hop. However, there were statistically significant results for which artist worked harder. An independent samples t-test was conducted to confirm whether race influenced “how hard” the artist was perceived to work; the results were as follows: t(31)=-2.07, pt-test was conducted on the participants’ likeliness to attend the artists’ concert based on the artists race with results as followed: t(31)=-1.55, n.s., showing no statistical significance.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Stereotyping a Musician’s Race to a Genre

CREVELING 8

People often draw from social schemas as a tool to generalize information or form a “mental shortcut”. In many cases, however, this results in erroneous assumptions and stereotypes. The current study used a between-groups experimental design to examine the susceptibility of the human mind to unconsciously stereotype when informed of an individual’s race. The sample consisted of 33 participants (24 female, 8 male, 1 non-binary) with an age range of 18 to 55. Participants lacked ethnic diversity as 24 were Chicano/a Latina/o/x Hispanic. The researchers hypothesized that participants would attach specific types of music to specific racial backgrounds. More specifically, the researchers hypothesized when reading a story with a musical artist of African descent, the participants will associate the artist’s musical genre to R & B or Hip-hop. Similarly, when reading a story with an artist who was said to be Caucasian, participants will associate the artist’s genre to EDM or Indie Pop. It was also hypothesized that there would be a difference between the Caucasian and African artist in the perception of effort involved in their rise to fame. Lastly, the study investigated whether the likelihood of attending the artists’ concert was dependent on the race of the artist. While the hypotheses for genre identification and likeliness of attending the concert were not statistically significant, the hypothesis on perception of effort involved in their rise to fame yielded significant results. Higher scores were yielded for the Caucasian artist as compared to the African artist in their effort involved in their rise to fame. The authors conclude that stereotyping continues to exist even in industries known for being inclusive and valuing diversity. Care must be taken not to cling to cognitive shortcuts at the expense of accuracy and open-mindedness.