Presentation Title

Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep Can Predict Sleep-Induced Working Memory Improvement

Faculty Mentor

Sara Mednick

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 16

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Working memory (WM), the ability to mentally hold and use information, may benefit from sleep. Sleep deprivation leads to WM impairments, and daytime naps support post-training WM. Researchers investigated the role of the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in WM, reporting that individuals with high waking parasympathetic activity perform better in WM tasks. Further, our group found a temporal relationship between electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep events and ANS measured in electrocardiogram (ECG) during non-REM sleep that can predict long-term memory consolidation. It is unknown, however, whether coupling of these autonomic/central events (ACEs) may play a role in WM. For the current study, we tested young adults on WM tasks before and after a daytime nap with EEG and ECG recording, or an active wake period. 115 young adults (50 females, 65 males; mean age 20.7, standard deviation 2.9) were randomly assigned to wake (W, n=51) or nap (N, n=54) between 1:30 and 3:30 pm. At 11 am and 4 pm, participants were tested on Operation-Word-Span tasks of remembering a 7-letter string, with each letter separated by a math problem to verify. Scores were calculated as differences in correct trials between two sessions. ACEs were identified as heart rate bursts (HRBs) temporally coincident with Delta activity (0.5-4 Hz) increases, followed by a parasympathetic activity surge. ACE change scores were calculated as differences between Delta EEG power during 5-seconds before HRBs and baseline periods with no HRBs. We found that delta activity increased during ACEs in all EEG channels (ps <0.001). Furthermore, we showed that the Nap group significantly improved in WM, compared to the Wake group (p<0.001). Interestingly, improvements significantly correlated with ACE in central channels (r>.366; p<.04). Our findings suggest that heart-brain interactions play a role in brain plasticity during sleep and may benefit waking WM performance.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep Can Predict Sleep-Induced Working Memory Improvement

CREVELING 16

Working memory (WM), the ability to mentally hold and use information, may benefit from sleep. Sleep deprivation leads to WM impairments, and daytime naps support post-training WM. Researchers investigated the role of the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in WM, reporting that individuals with high waking parasympathetic activity perform better in WM tasks. Further, our group found a temporal relationship between electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep events and ANS measured in electrocardiogram (ECG) during non-REM sleep that can predict long-term memory consolidation. It is unknown, however, whether coupling of these autonomic/central events (ACEs) may play a role in WM. For the current study, we tested young adults on WM tasks before and after a daytime nap with EEG and ECG recording, or an active wake period. 115 young adults (50 females, 65 males; mean age 20.7, standard deviation 2.9) were randomly assigned to wake (W, n=51) or nap (N, n=54) between 1:30 and 3:30 pm. At 11 am and 4 pm, participants were tested on Operation-Word-Span tasks of remembering a 7-letter string, with each letter separated by a math problem to verify. Scores were calculated as differences in correct trials between two sessions. ACEs were identified as heart rate bursts (HRBs) temporally coincident with Delta activity (0.5-4 Hz) increases, followed by a parasympathetic activity surge. ACE change scores were calculated as differences between Delta EEG power during 5-seconds before HRBs and baseline periods with no HRBs. We found that delta activity increased during ACEs in all EEG channels (ps <0.001). Furthermore, we showed that the Nap group significantly improved in WM, compared to the Wake group (p<0.001). Interestingly, improvements significantly correlated with ACE in central channels (r>.366; p<.04). Our findings suggest that heart-brain interactions play a role in brain plasticity during sleep and may benefit waking WM performance.