Presentation Title

Sport Anxiety: Previously injured vs. non-injured athletes

Faculty Mentor

Megan Granquist

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 82

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Sport Anxiety: Previously Injured vs Non-injured Athletes

Savannah Fisher: University of La Verne, La Verne CA

Context: When you are a college athlete injury is part of your life. Each year 40% to 50% of collegiate athletes are injured (Li, Moreland, Peek-Asa, & Yang, 2017). Leaving out the stress of getting injured, collegiate athletes still have their academics to worry about, and balancing the life of academics and athletics can lead to various mental health concerns. The stressors of life are risk factors for injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998); athletes experiencing anxiety have an increased chance of getting an injury.

Objective: To examine the difference in sport anxiety of collegiate athletes between those who had previously been injured and those who had not.

Setting: Division III NCAA university

Data Collection: Data was IRB approved archival data provided by Dr. Megan Granquist.

Participants: Ninety-one collegiate athletes (50 males, 41 females); 73 who had previously been injured.

Variables: Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2; Smith, Smoll, Cumming, & Grossbard, 2006); self-reported injury (yes/no).

Results: SAS-2 mean total for participants who had been previously injured = 25.47 (SD = 7.59). SAS-2 mean total for participants who had not been previously injured = 22.94 (SD = 7.46). The results show no statistically significant difference between previously injured vs. non-previously injured participants and sport anxiety (t = 1.245 (88), p = .216).

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Sport Anxiety: Previously injured vs. non-injured athletes

CREVELING 82

Sport Anxiety: Previously Injured vs Non-injured Athletes

Savannah Fisher: University of La Verne, La Verne CA

Context: When you are a college athlete injury is part of your life. Each year 40% to 50% of collegiate athletes are injured (Li, Moreland, Peek-Asa, & Yang, 2017). Leaving out the stress of getting injured, collegiate athletes still have their academics to worry about, and balancing the life of academics and athletics can lead to various mental health concerns. The stressors of life are risk factors for injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998); athletes experiencing anxiety have an increased chance of getting an injury.

Objective: To examine the difference in sport anxiety of collegiate athletes between those who had previously been injured and those who had not.

Setting: Division III NCAA university

Data Collection: Data was IRB approved archival data provided by Dr. Megan Granquist.

Participants: Ninety-one collegiate athletes (50 males, 41 females); 73 who had previously been injured.

Variables: Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2; Smith, Smoll, Cumming, & Grossbard, 2006); self-reported injury (yes/no).

Results: SAS-2 mean total for participants who had been previously injured = 25.47 (SD = 7.59). SAS-2 mean total for participants who had not been previously injured = 22.94 (SD = 7.46). The results show no statistically significant difference between previously injured vs. non-previously injured participants and sport anxiety (t = 1.245 (88), p = .216).