Presentation Title

MHC( Major Histocompatibilty Complex) and Mate Selection

Presenter Information

Chowdhury Marzia MahjabinFollow

Faculty Mentor

Chowdhury Marzia Mahjabin

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 17

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Females find the odor of that male attractive who smells most differently from them known as the MHC. MHC plays an important role in mate selection. MHC dissimilar genes help to produce more immune offspring. The idea is whether the same odor is accepted or rejected by females depending on MHC dissimilarity. This will help people to understand that the attractive odor from their partners is not only dependent on social preferences. If females can use their olfactory system to detect dissimilar MHC, this will not only conclude that the body odor is attractive but will also let people know that their offspring produced will be better immune to pathogens. Female participants were asked to smell shirts of males and select the shirt’s odor they like. Then they were asked whether they selected the shirt because it smelled like them/family member or it stood out as a very dissimilar odor. More females selected the shirt that smelled different from their own body odor. It also explained why inbreeding caused offspring to be less immune to different kinds of pathogens. Females selected shirts that smelled different from their own body odor. The results concluded that my hypothesis was correct. The broader implication is that mating is not only affected by social features such as wealth and personality, science also plays an important role in mate selection. An HLA typing test was not possible to determine whether the DNA of the female participant and the selected shirt’s male had different allelic diversity. Females participants were from different races to avoid bias of social preferences. This project will add evidence to the idea that females use their olfactory senses to detect the MHC-related odor given out by males (pheromones on sweat) by which they decide to mate or not to mate with a particular male.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

MHC( Major Histocompatibilty Complex) and Mate Selection

CREVELING 17

Females find the odor of that male attractive who smells most differently from them known as the MHC. MHC plays an important role in mate selection. MHC dissimilar genes help to produce more immune offspring. The idea is whether the same odor is accepted or rejected by females depending on MHC dissimilarity. This will help people to understand that the attractive odor from their partners is not only dependent on social preferences. If females can use their olfactory system to detect dissimilar MHC, this will not only conclude that the body odor is attractive but will also let people know that their offspring produced will be better immune to pathogens. Female participants were asked to smell shirts of males and select the shirt’s odor they like. Then they were asked whether they selected the shirt because it smelled like them/family member or it stood out as a very dissimilar odor. More females selected the shirt that smelled different from their own body odor. It also explained why inbreeding caused offspring to be less immune to different kinds of pathogens. Females selected shirts that smelled different from their own body odor. The results concluded that my hypothesis was correct. The broader implication is that mating is not only affected by social features such as wealth and personality, science also plays an important role in mate selection. An HLA typing test was not possible to determine whether the DNA of the female participant and the selected shirt’s male had different allelic diversity. Females participants were from different races to avoid bias of social preferences. This project will add evidence to the idea that females use their olfactory senses to detect the MHC-related odor given out by males (pheromones on sweat) by which they decide to mate or not to mate with a particular male.