Presentation Title

Modern Day Taxation without Representation

Presenter Information

Zoya AnsariFollow

Faculty Mentor

Joon Kil

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:15 AM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

One of the basic principles of revolutionaries in 1776 was the notion of “no taxation without representation”, a phrase cried out in writings in an attempt to ignite fellow colonists. Today, citizens of D.C. argue for equal representation, utilizing the slogan on posters and license plates in protest(Mark 2001: 14). The modern day capital district of the United States lacks the same voting representation the colonists so valiantly fought for, effectively creating an institution in which the citizens of D.C. lack basic congressional representation. While there are a multitude of causes which influence statehood, there are three defined factors that bar D.C. from achieving representation: Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 of the Constitution, the Founding Fathers’ original intent for the capital, and modern partisan opposition. The constitutional clause has had lasting consequences, seen through Adams v. Clinton in 2000 and the 2006 Fair and Equal Voting Rights Act. Additionally, modern day opposition is present on both sides of the political aisle, as both Democrats and Republicans, on the basis of party power, have rejected bills to grant D.C. statehood. These rejections were argued on the basis of the clause as well as the original intent of the creation of the district, outlined by the Founding Fathers. The subject of statehood has become more prominent recently, with more bills and amendments being proposed, which makes it important to understand why representation has not been granted yet.

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Nov 17th, 9:00 AM Nov 17th, 9:15 AM

Modern Day Taxation without Representation

C151

One of the basic principles of revolutionaries in 1776 was the notion of “no taxation without representation”, a phrase cried out in writings in an attempt to ignite fellow colonists. Today, citizens of D.C. argue for equal representation, utilizing the slogan on posters and license plates in protest(Mark 2001: 14). The modern day capital district of the United States lacks the same voting representation the colonists so valiantly fought for, effectively creating an institution in which the citizens of D.C. lack basic congressional representation. While there are a multitude of causes which influence statehood, there are three defined factors that bar D.C. from achieving representation: Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 of the Constitution, the Founding Fathers’ original intent for the capital, and modern partisan opposition. The constitutional clause has had lasting consequences, seen through Adams v. Clinton in 2000 and the 2006 Fair and Equal Voting Rights Act. Additionally, modern day opposition is present on both sides of the political aisle, as both Democrats and Republicans, on the basis of party power, have rejected bills to grant D.C. statehood. These rejections were argued on the basis of the clause as well as the original intent of the creation of the district, outlined by the Founding Fathers. The subject of statehood has become more prominent recently, with more bills and amendments being proposed, which makes it important to understand why representation has not been granted yet.