Presentation Title

Mental Illness and Incarceration

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Jails and Prisons often contain many individuals with a wide array of mental illnesses (Matejkowski & Ostermann, 2014). Related to this, the literature reported that local jails have surpassed mental health facilities as one of the leading providers for mental health treatment (Morgan, Fisher, Duan, Mandracchia, & Murray, 2010). Torrey (1995) also stated that the Los Angeles County Jail system has become the nation’s largest provider of mental health services. These findings provide further evidence that individuals who are incarcerated often have some form of mental illness. As an initial step to examine the effects of mental illness on incarceration, it was investigated whether age of incarceration differed in terms of the existence of mental disorders (antisocial disorder and anxiety disorder) by using data from the Relationship of Mental Disorders to Violent Behavior in the United State, 1983-1984 (Collins, Bailey, Phillips, & Craddock, 1993). An indication of a lifetime anxiety disorder and a lifetime antisocial disorder were employed as factors and the age at which the individuals entered incarceration was used as the outcome variable. Results from a two-way ANOVA revealed that individuals having a lifetime antisocial disorder had a higher outcome of becoming incarcerated and individuals with a lifetime anxiety disorder did not show a significantly higher outcome of being incarcerated. The current findings lead further research to expand on various different mental disorders that were not looked at and the impact those mental disorders can have on an individual’s likelihood of becoming incarcerated. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how having a lifetime antisocial disorder can lead to incarceration.

Summary of research results to be presented

As an initial step to examine the effects of mental illness on incarceration, it was investigated whether age of incarceration differed in terms of the existence of mental disorders (antisocial disorder and anxiety disorder) by using data from the Relationship of Mental Disorders to Violent Behavior in the United State, 1983-1984 (Collins, Bailey, Phillips, & Craddock, 1993). An indication of a lifetime anxiety disorder and a lifetime antisocial disorder were employed as factors and the age at which the individuals entered incarceration was used as the outcome variable. Results from a two-way ANOVA revealed that individuals having a lifetime antisocial disorder had a higher outcome of becoming incarcerated and individuals with a lifetime anxiety disorder did not show a significantly higher outcome of being incarcerated. The current findings lead further research to expand on various different mental disorders that were not looked at and the impact those mental disorders can have on an individual’s likelihood of becoming incarcerated. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how having a lifetime antisocial disorder can lead to incarceration.

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Nov 17th, 9:30 AM Nov 17th, 9:45 AM

Mental Illness and Incarceration

C151

Jails and Prisons often contain many individuals with a wide array of mental illnesses (Matejkowski & Ostermann, 2014). Related to this, the literature reported that local jails have surpassed mental health facilities as one of the leading providers for mental health treatment (Morgan, Fisher, Duan, Mandracchia, & Murray, 2010). Torrey (1995) also stated that the Los Angeles County Jail system has become the nation’s largest provider of mental health services. These findings provide further evidence that individuals who are incarcerated often have some form of mental illness. As an initial step to examine the effects of mental illness on incarceration, it was investigated whether age of incarceration differed in terms of the existence of mental disorders (antisocial disorder and anxiety disorder) by using data from the Relationship of Mental Disorders to Violent Behavior in the United State, 1983-1984 (Collins, Bailey, Phillips, & Craddock, 1993). An indication of a lifetime anxiety disorder and a lifetime antisocial disorder were employed as factors and the age at which the individuals entered incarceration was used as the outcome variable. Results from a two-way ANOVA revealed that individuals having a lifetime antisocial disorder had a higher outcome of becoming incarcerated and individuals with a lifetime anxiety disorder did not show a significantly higher outcome of being incarcerated. The current findings lead further research to expand on various different mental disorders that were not looked at and the impact those mental disorders can have on an individual’s likelihood of becoming incarcerated. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how having a lifetime antisocial disorder can lead to incarceration.