Presentation Title

Predicting Postpartum Depression: A Closer Look at Social Support and Socioeconomic Status

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Weldon Smith, Dr. HyeSun Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:00 AM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

A woman experiencing pregnancy might anticipate dirty diapers and the cries of an infant, but she might not anticipate the changes that she will be enduring. Though some women welcome their newborn with ease, others find themselves unable to care for their infant and find themselves experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression. Postpartum depression consists of ongoing sadness, lack of energy and many more symptoms that ultimately lead up to suicidal intentions as described by Stepanikova and Kukla (2017). Beeghly, Olson, Weinberg, Pierre, Downey, and Tronick (2003) speak about the chances of low income and low social support significantly increasing the chances of developing postpartum depression. In this current study we attempt to identify whether social support and socioeconomic status can predict postpartum depression by using data from the Memphis New Mother Study (Olds and Kitzman,1990-1994). There were two different types of social support which were social support from a boyfriend or husband, and social support from the mother’s mother. Socioeconomic status was based on self-reported annual income, family size, and medicaid eligibility criteria. The results from the multiple regression analysis revealed that social support from the mother’s mother predicted postpartum depression more significantly than social support from a boyfriend or husband; moreover, the socioeconomic status of the mother did not reveal significance as a predictor. Regarding the findings of the current research, we further the possibilities of more in depth research on the influences that social support has on predicting postpartum depression. Social support is perceived differently throughout the levels of socioeconomic status, so we propose that socioeconomic status be more specifically categorized. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

In this current study we attempt to identify whether social support and socioeconomic status can predict postpartum depression by using data from the Memphis New Mother Study (Olds and Kitzman,1990-1994). There were two different types of social support which were social support from a boyfriend or husband, and social support from the mother’s mother. Socioeconomic status was based on self-reported annual income, family size, and medicaid eligibility criteria. The results from the multiple regression analysis revealed that social support from the mother’s mother predicted postpartum depression more significantly than social support from a boyfriend or husband; moreover, the socioeconomic status of the mother did not reveal significance as a predictor. Regarding the findings of the current research, we further the possibilities of more in depth research on the influences that social support has on predicting postpartum depression. Social support is perceived differently throughout the levels of socioeconomic status, so we propose that socioeconomic status be more specifically categorized.

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Nov 17th, 9:45 AM Nov 17th, 10:00 AM

Predicting Postpartum Depression: A Closer Look at Social Support and Socioeconomic Status

C151

A woman experiencing pregnancy might anticipate dirty diapers and the cries of an infant, but she might not anticipate the changes that she will be enduring. Though some women welcome their newborn with ease, others find themselves unable to care for their infant and find themselves experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression. Postpartum depression consists of ongoing sadness, lack of energy and many more symptoms that ultimately lead up to suicidal intentions as described by Stepanikova and Kukla (2017). Beeghly, Olson, Weinberg, Pierre, Downey, and Tronick (2003) speak about the chances of low income and low social support significantly increasing the chances of developing postpartum depression. In this current study we attempt to identify whether social support and socioeconomic status can predict postpartum depression by using data from the Memphis New Mother Study (Olds and Kitzman,1990-1994). There were two different types of social support which were social support from a boyfriend or husband, and social support from the mother’s mother. Socioeconomic status was based on self-reported annual income, family size, and medicaid eligibility criteria. The results from the multiple regression analysis revealed that social support from the mother’s mother predicted postpartum depression more significantly than social support from a boyfriend or husband; moreover, the socioeconomic status of the mother did not reveal significance as a predictor. Regarding the findings of the current research, we further the possibilities of more in depth research on the influences that social support has on predicting postpartum depression. Social support is perceived differently throughout the levels of socioeconomic status, so we propose that socioeconomic status be more specifically categorized. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.