Presentation Title

Deflecting Trait Perceptions of Arrogance Through the Manipulation of Ordinal Placement of Disclaimers

Faculty Mentor

Andrea Richards

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:00 AM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Research indicates that the use of disclaimers often backfires. The use of a disclaimer has a significant effect of increasing the perception of a trait when used before a statement that contains the trait being disclaimed against (El-Alayli, Myers, Petersen, & Lystad, 2008). Our study investigated the effects of arrogance disclaimer position on the person perception of a speaker’s arrogance. 90 subjects read one of six scenarios. The six scenarios included either: an arrogant statement with a disclaimer before; an arrogant statement with no disclaimer; an arrogant statement with a disclaimer after; a non-arrogant statement with a disclaimer before; a non-arrogant statement with no disclaimer; a non-arrogant statement with a disclaimer after. Person perception of arrogance was rated on a 0-9 scale. Results indicated that disclaimer position with an arrogant statement had a significant effect on person perception of arrogance (p<.05), with a disclaimer after an arrogant statement being most effective, but that disclaimer position with a non-arrogant statement had no effect on person perception of arrogance (p>.05). This study demonstrated that backfiring can be forestalled if a disclaimer comes after a statement as opposed to before it.

Keywords: arrogance; disclaimer; disclaimer backfire; disclaimer position; trait perception

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Nov 17th, 9:45 AM Nov 17th, 10:00 AM

Deflecting Trait Perceptions of Arrogance Through the Manipulation of Ordinal Placement of Disclaimers

C153

Research indicates that the use of disclaimers often backfires. The use of a disclaimer has a significant effect of increasing the perception of a trait when used before a statement that contains the trait being disclaimed against (El-Alayli, Myers, Petersen, & Lystad, 2008). Our study investigated the effects of arrogance disclaimer position on the person perception of a speaker’s arrogance. 90 subjects read one of six scenarios. The six scenarios included either: an arrogant statement with a disclaimer before; an arrogant statement with no disclaimer; an arrogant statement with a disclaimer after; a non-arrogant statement with a disclaimer before; a non-arrogant statement with no disclaimer; a non-arrogant statement with a disclaimer after. Person perception of arrogance was rated on a 0-9 scale. Results indicated that disclaimer position with an arrogant statement had a significant effect on person perception of arrogance (p<.05), with a disclaimer after an arrogant statement being most effective, but that disclaimer position with a non-arrogant statement had no effect on person perception of arrogance (p>.05). This study demonstrated that backfiring can be forestalled if a disclaimer comes after a statement as opposed to before it.

Keywords: arrogance; disclaimer; disclaimer backfire; disclaimer position; trait perception