Presentation Title

Untapped: Exploring the Intersection Between Immigration Identity and Household Water Conservation in Los Angeles

Faculty Mentor

Jessica Cattelino

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:00 AM

Location

C158

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In the United States, immigration status has affected access to water, as well as household water conservation. Throughout history, the immigrant identity has been racialized and contrasted against the standard set by white populations. As such, white expertise on water conservation is often well researched, but expertise within immigrant communities are overlooked. This research aims to bridge this gap and bring attention to water use and conservation of immigrant households. Through analysis of interviews with 40 different families in 4 diverse Los Angeles neighborhoods, this research examines the difference in water conservation between immigrant and white households. Results show that immigrants have knowledge of water conservation techniques, brought over from practices in their nation of origin. Some individuals have experienced water scarcity and lack of access to water in their countries of origin. As such, these experiences shape how individuals conserve water. The methods of water conservation differs from household to household. As Los Angeles and the United States are populated by immigrants, it is important to understand conservation practices to inform water conservation policy from diverse sources, including immigrant expertise.

Summary of research results to be presented

This study has found immigrant households have a plethora of water conservation practices, brought over from unique experiences and knowledge of water conservation from their country of origin. Many of our research participants emigrated from countries in the Global South. Some individuals have experienced water scarcity and lack of access to water in their countries of origin. As such, these experiences shape how individuals conserve water. Additionally, we found that women facilitate the process of passing down knowledge of water conservation in the United States and in the country of origin. Children of immigrants born in the United States, however, do not always continue the practice of water conservation as they believe there is not a need to conserve water. Immigrants themselves also lose water conservation practices in the United States as they gain better access to water here. While practices may not continue to be in use, the embodied experience and knowledge of water conservation still remains within the household. In the past, knowledge of water conservation have been sought after primarily in white communities; however, this study demonstrates that immigrant households have applied knowledge of unique water conservation practices that have been previously underrepresented.

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Nov 17th, 9:45 AM Nov 17th, 10:00 AM

Untapped: Exploring the Intersection Between Immigration Identity and Household Water Conservation in Los Angeles

C158

In the United States, immigration status has affected access to water, as well as household water conservation. Throughout history, the immigrant identity has been racialized and contrasted against the standard set by white populations. As such, white expertise on water conservation is often well researched, but expertise within immigrant communities are overlooked. This research aims to bridge this gap and bring attention to water use and conservation of immigrant households. Through analysis of interviews with 40 different families in 4 diverse Los Angeles neighborhoods, this research examines the difference in water conservation between immigrant and white households. Results show that immigrants have knowledge of water conservation techniques, brought over from practices in their nation of origin. Some individuals have experienced water scarcity and lack of access to water in their countries of origin. As such, these experiences shape how individuals conserve water. The methods of water conservation differs from household to household. As Los Angeles and the United States are populated by immigrants, it is important to understand conservation practices to inform water conservation policy from diverse sources, including immigrant expertise.