Presentation Title

Who Do College Students Identify as On-campus Perpetrators of Gender and Racial Discrimination?

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Felicia Friendly Thomas

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Data collected 2015-2018 and presented at WPA 2018 indicated many college students experienced both Global and Campus Specific Ethnic/Racial Discrimination and Gender Discrimination. The current project (2018-2019) investigated whether students were still feeling discriminated against in times where awareness in maintaining cultural and gender equality is more prevalent. Participants (n=1783) were of a diverse sample, being enrolled in a public university where 72.8% of the student body identified as underrepresented minorities. The Participant’s ranged in their years of college education: Freshman (45.3%), Sophomore (26.5%), Junior (16.7%), and Senior (11%). Students self-identified as (45.8%) Male, (52.9%) Female, and (0.8%) Other. Students whom were at the age of 18 to 23 self-identified as traditional students (94.2%), while students aged 24 to 30+ years old identified themselves as non-traditional students (5.6%). First-Generation College Students (46%) and Second-Generation College Students (53.4%) were among the sample population. Social Economic Status of Students ranged from Upper Class Students (19.1%), Middle Class (53.1%), and Lower Class (27.2%).Participants completed a survey regarding: (1) Global Ethnic/Racial Discrimination (G-ERD); (2) Campus Specific Ethnic/Racial Discrimination (CS-ERD); (3) Global Gender Discrimination (G-GD); and (4) Campus Specific Gender Discrimination (CS-GD). (5) Participants were also asked to identify on-campus perpetrator(s). Based upon their Ethnic/Racial identity 12% of students still felt discriminated against on-campus, while 6% of students felt discriminated against on-campus based on their gender. Globally, 49% of students felt discriminated against off-campus, because of their Ethnic/Racial identity, while 27% of students felt discriminated against off-campus because of their gender. Even though students self-reported experiencing less ethnic/racial and gender discrimination on campus as compared to globally, implementation of a Zero Tolerance policy towards on-campus perpetrators of discrimination is still necessary.

Summary of research results to be presented

RESULTS

1. Global versus Campus Specific Ethnic/Racial Discrimination – Reported (a) G-ERD declined from 2015 (61%), 2016 (51%) to 2018 (49.1%); and (b) CS-ERD declined from 2015 (28%), but stayed the same from 2017 (12%) to 2018 (12%).

2. Global versus Campus Specific Gender Discrimination Reported (a) G-GD declined dramatically from 2015 (59%), 2017 (28%) to 2018 (26.7 %); and (b) C-GD also declined from 2015 (21%), 2016 (7%), to 2018 (6.3%).

3. Participants’ Ethnicity and discrimination Reports of both G-ERD and CS-ERD declined among all ethnic/racial groups. However, similar to 2015 results, (a) reports of G-ERD differed among racial/ethnic groups in 2016: Blacks (81%), Asians (56%), Hispanics (51%) and Whites (39%). There were no significant CS-ERD differences among groups.

4. Participants’ Gender and discrimination – (a) Female participants were significantly more likely to report (a) G-GD (41%) as compared to male participants (14%), as well as (b) CS-GD as compared to male participants, 10% and 4% respectively. This differed from 2015 where significant gender differences were not found.

5. Perpetrators of Campus Specific Discrimination – (a) Participants who reported CS-ERD, most often identified fellow students as perpetrators (43%), followed by instructors (23%), others (22%) and staff/administrators (12%). (b) Similar results were found for CS-GD (students = 65%; instructors= 18%, others = 9%, and staff/administrators = 8%).

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Nov 17th, 10:15 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Who Do College Students Identify as On-campus Perpetrators of Gender and Racial Discrimination?

C153

Data collected 2015-2018 and presented at WPA 2018 indicated many college students experienced both Global and Campus Specific Ethnic/Racial Discrimination and Gender Discrimination. The current project (2018-2019) investigated whether students were still feeling discriminated against in times where awareness in maintaining cultural and gender equality is more prevalent. Participants (n=1783) were of a diverse sample, being enrolled in a public university where 72.8% of the student body identified as underrepresented minorities. The Participant’s ranged in their years of college education: Freshman (45.3%), Sophomore (26.5%), Junior (16.7%), and Senior (11%). Students self-identified as (45.8%) Male, (52.9%) Female, and (0.8%) Other. Students whom were at the age of 18 to 23 self-identified as traditional students (94.2%), while students aged 24 to 30+ years old identified themselves as non-traditional students (5.6%). First-Generation College Students (46%) and Second-Generation College Students (53.4%) were among the sample population. Social Economic Status of Students ranged from Upper Class Students (19.1%), Middle Class (53.1%), and Lower Class (27.2%).Participants completed a survey regarding: (1) Global Ethnic/Racial Discrimination (G-ERD); (2) Campus Specific Ethnic/Racial Discrimination (CS-ERD); (3) Global Gender Discrimination (G-GD); and (4) Campus Specific Gender Discrimination (CS-GD). (5) Participants were also asked to identify on-campus perpetrator(s). Based upon their Ethnic/Racial identity 12% of students still felt discriminated against on-campus, while 6% of students felt discriminated against on-campus based on their gender. Globally, 49% of students felt discriminated against off-campus, because of their Ethnic/Racial identity, while 27% of students felt discriminated against off-campus because of their gender. Even though students self-reported experiencing less ethnic/racial and gender discrimination on campus as compared to globally, implementation of a Zero Tolerance policy towards on-campus perpetrators of discrimination is still necessary.