Presentation Title

Predicting Alcohol Consumption Through Collegiate Involvement

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Weldon Smith, Dr. HyeSun Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 1:45 PM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

45% of the US’s 9 million college students have been reported to frequently engage in excessive alcohol consumption, which in turn can lead to the enactment of potentially risky behaviors (Buscemi et al., 2017). Such behavior creates hazardous environments on-campus and can entail the expenditure of institutional resources on security, property damage, and emergency medical services (Carey, Scott-Sheldon, Elliot, and Casey, 2016). Using the data from Surveys of Undergraduate Students in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, 1972 – 1991, we investigated whether the level of collegiate involvement a student has can be used to reliably predict their frequency of alcohol consumption in order to better understand potential contributing factors to this problem behavior. The variables were conceptualized into two groups based on their specific aspect in college life: academic involvement, which consisted of the amount of credits the participant was taking that semester, as well as extracurricular involvement, which consisted of the amount of hours the participant spent on extracurricular activities per week and the level of satisfaction said participant reported having about the institution. The results from a multiple regression analysis revealed that while satisfaction with the institution and the amount of time spent doing extracurricular activities were significant predictors of alcohol consumption, the amount of credits taken this semester was not. This result is surprising as previous research (Russell, Almeida, & Maggs, 2017) has shown that the amount of stressors a college student faces in daily life can predict an increase in the amount of alcohol they consume. Based on current findings, we shall focus more on extracurricular investments as significant predictors. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

Using the data from Surveys of Undergraduate Students in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, 1972 – 1991, we investigated whether the level of collegiate involvement a student has can be used to reliably predict their frequency of alcohol consumption in order to better understand potential contributing factors to this problem behavior. The variables were conceptualized into two groups based on their specific aspect in college life: academic involvement, which consisted of the amount of credits the participant was taking that semester, as well as extracurricular involvement, which consisted of the amount of hours the participant spent on extracurricular activities per week and the level of satisfaction said participant reported having about the institution. The results from a multiple regression analysis revealed that while satisfaction with the institution and the amount of time spent doing extracurricular activities were significant predictors of alcohol consumption, the amount of credits taken this semester was not. This result is surprising as previous research (Russell, Almeida, & Maggs, 2017) has shown that the amount of stressors a college student faces in daily life can predict an increase in the amount of alcohol they consume. Based on current findings, we shall focus more on extracurricular investments as significant predictors. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

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Nov 17th, 1:30 PM Nov 17th, 1:45 PM

Predicting Alcohol Consumption Through Collegiate Involvement

C153

45% of the US’s 9 million college students have been reported to frequently engage in excessive alcohol consumption, which in turn can lead to the enactment of potentially risky behaviors (Buscemi et al., 2017). Such behavior creates hazardous environments on-campus and can entail the expenditure of institutional resources on security, property damage, and emergency medical services (Carey, Scott-Sheldon, Elliot, and Casey, 2016). Using the data from Surveys of Undergraduate Students in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, 1972 – 1991, we investigated whether the level of collegiate involvement a student has can be used to reliably predict their frequency of alcohol consumption in order to better understand potential contributing factors to this problem behavior. The variables were conceptualized into two groups based on their specific aspect in college life: academic involvement, which consisted of the amount of credits the participant was taking that semester, as well as extracurricular involvement, which consisted of the amount of hours the participant spent on extracurricular activities per week and the level of satisfaction said participant reported having about the institution. The results from a multiple regression analysis revealed that while satisfaction with the institution and the amount of time spent doing extracurricular activities were significant predictors of alcohol consumption, the amount of credits taken this semester was not. This result is surprising as previous research (Russell, Almeida, & Maggs, 2017) has shown that the amount of stressors a college student faces in daily life can predict an increase in the amount of alcohol they consume. Based on current findings, we shall focus more on extracurricular investments as significant predictors. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.