Presentation Title

Impact of sexual traumas on social and intimate relationships

Faculty Mentor

Chong Ho Yu

Start Date

17-11-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The nation is divided due to the hearing of Kavanaugh and a common defense is that Professor Ford didn’t say anything in the past 36 years. One of the central messages of the me-too movement is that in the past patriarchal society females were afraid of speaking out about their sexual assaults. As a result, the psychological impact of sexual traumas has been under-studied for a long time. Hence, this research team investigated how sexual traumas would affect both social relationships in general and intimate relationships of the victims. Utilizing survey data collected in a private Southwestern Christian university, we performed both chi-square analysis and data visualization (Mosaic plot and dot plot) to examine the association. The original sample size is 435 but only a small portion of students experienced one or more of the following sexual assaults: sexually touched without consent (n=32), sexual penetration attempt without consent (n= 16), and sexual penetration without consent (n= 8). Due to a high degree of asymmetry between the number of female victims and that of the remaining students, a case-control approach was adopted i.e. in all three analyses an equal number of students who never experienced any form of sexual assault were randomly selected based on the matching profile to the victims. It was found that female students who experienced involuntarily sexual touch (X2 = 3.925, p = .0476) or sexual penetration attempt (X2 = 8.5, p= .0035) reported significant difficulty in developing intimate relationships, but not social relationships in general. Because the sample size for the third group is very small, any statistical model might be unstable (i.e. varying from sample to sample). Our next course of action is to collect qualitative data for this group in the next round of data collection.

Summary of research results to be presented

Demographic profiles of the victims in all three categories of sexual assault were examined. It was found that there were no international students, freshman, and married couples among female students who were sexually touched without consent. The profile of female students who experienced sexual penetration attempt is similar except that there were no fifth-year seniors. Based on these profiles, 32, 16, and 8 random students were chosen to match the cases of all three types of sexual assault. The chi-square analyses indicated that female students who experienced involuntarily sexual touch (X2 = 3.925, p = .0476) or sexual penetration attempt (X2 = 8.5, p = .0035) reported significant difficulty in developing intimate relationships, but not social relationships in general. However, there was no significant association between reporting difficulties in social/intimate relationships and sexual penetration without consent (X2 = 1.446, p = .2291). It is noteworthy that in this analysis three cell counts are less than five, and therefore chi-square analysis might be invalid. As a remedy, the Fisher’s exact test was employed. However, still no significant result was yielded (p = .3469). It is important to point out that absence of evidence is not equated with evidence of absence. The disconnection between sexual penetration and relationship problem could be due to the low sample size and lack of statistical power.

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Nov 17th, 1:45 PM Nov 17th, 2:00 PM

Impact of sexual traumas on social and intimate relationships

C151

The nation is divided due to the hearing of Kavanaugh and a common defense is that Professor Ford didn’t say anything in the past 36 years. One of the central messages of the me-too movement is that in the past patriarchal society females were afraid of speaking out about their sexual assaults. As a result, the psychological impact of sexual traumas has been under-studied for a long time. Hence, this research team investigated how sexual traumas would affect both social relationships in general and intimate relationships of the victims. Utilizing survey data collected in a private Southwestern Christian university, we performed both chi-square analysis and data visualization (Mosaic plot and dot plot) to examine the association. The original sample size is 435 but only a small portion of students experienced one or more of the following sexual assaults: sexually touched without consent (n=32), sexual penetration attempt without consent (n= 16), and sexual penetration without consent (n= 8). Due to a high degree of asymmetry between the number of female victims and that of the remaining students, a case-control approach was adopted i.e. in all three analyses an equal number of students who never experienced any form of sexual assault were randomly selected based on the matching profile to the victims. It was found that female students who experienced involuntarily sexual touch (X2 = 3.925, p = .0476) or sexual penetration attempt (X2 = 8.5, p= .0035) reported significant difficulty in developing intimate relationships, but not social relationships in general. Because the sample size for the third group is very small, any statistical model might be unstable (i.e. varying from sample to sample). Our next course of action is to collect qualitative data for this group in the next round of data collection.