Presentation Title

It’s Driving Her Mad: Greater Commuting Stress Among Female College Students

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Juliana Fuqua

Start Date

17-11-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Commuting to campus is a regular part of the daily life of many college students and can be very stressful, particularly for students at large campuses. Yet almost no commuting stress research focuses on male and female college students. This study focuses on analyzing commuting stress levels among college students. Research is much needed in this area in order to better understand commuting stress and how it affects students’ lives. Previous studies have provided conflicting results regarding whether gender is associated with commuting stress. Other key variables have been found clearly to be related to commuting stress, such as personal control, commute predictability, length of commute, stress awareness, and environmental factors. We investigated these factors and used them to gauge stress levels among 324 college students in Spring 2018. Students were recruited to complete our online questionnaire using an online subject pool. A variety of questions were used to measure the source of the commuter’s stress (e.g. traffic congestion, car accidents, unplanned delays), the length of their commute, and self-reported level of stress. statistical tests were run to determine the extent to which the variables of interest associated with commuting stress. Twelve focus groups with participants were also conducted and transcribed. A t test indicated that women report greater commuting stress (Mean = 3.40) than men (Mean = 3.00, t = -2.643, df =146, p

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 1:45 PM Nov 17th, 2:00 PM

It’s Driving Her Mad: Greater Commuting Stress Among Female College Students

C153

Commuting to campus is a regular part of the daily life of many college students and can be very stressful, particularly for students at large campuses. Yet almost no commuting stress research focuses on male and female college students. This study focuses on analyzing commuting stress levels among college students. Research is much needed in this area in order to better understand commuting stress and how it affects students’ lives. Previous studies have provided conflicting results regarding whether gender is associated with commuting stress. Other key variables have been found clearly to be related to commuting stress, such as personal control, commute predictability, length of commute, stress awareness, and environmental factors. We investigated these factors and used them to gauge stress levels among 324 college students in Spring 2018. Students were recruited to complete our online questionnaire using an online subject pool. A variety of questions were used to measure the source of the commuter’s stress (e.g. traffic congestion, car accidents, unplanned delays), the length of their commute, and self-reported level of stress. statistical tests were run to determine the extent to which the variables of interest associated with commuting stress. Twelve focus groups with participants were also conducted and transcribed. A t test indicated that women report greater commuting stress (Mean = 3.40) than men (Mean = 3.00, t = -2.643, df =146, p