Presentation Title

A Study of Midwifery Care as Resistance to Patriarchy

Presenter Information

Victoria KaralunFollow

Faculty Mentor

T.L. Brink

Start Date

17-11-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

Location

C158

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

During the last two centuries, it has been common practice for typically male doctors to deliver babies in a hospital. Some hospitals boast high levels of clinical births, with cesarean section rates rising over time. South Miami hospital tops the list and recently reported having delivered more babies by cesarean section than vaginally during the year, with the percentage reaching 51% cesarean and 49% vaginal. As a result, many women are feeling safer birthing at home than in the hospital and are turning from the hospital during pregnancy and birth as a form of resistance to the patriarchal model of medicine. This can be seen in the rising number of out-of-hospital births - the CDC reports that the percentage has been steadily rising since 2004 and currently accounts for around 1.5% of births.

Amidst the recent #metoo movement, the study focused on a local midwifery practice and looked into the individual reasons that women are turning to the women-centered practice of midwifery for well-woman care and natural home birth. It found that most women who had turned to this kind of care had witnessed or heard stories of clinical hospital births that were not pleasant and, in some cases, even considered to be ‘birth rape’. Just as the #metoo movement is bringing about protests and boycotts in other areas, it is bringing it to the birth and women’s health care world as men are being rejected from the birthing room.

Parallels are drawn to the ‘red tent’ of early civilizations and some current ones in Africa, which were designed for women to gather without men during menstruation, birth, and the postpartum period.

Summary of research results to be presented

This research has discovered that women are turning to the female-centered midwife rather than the male doctor or clinical environment of the hospital for well-woman care and birth, as a turn away from the patriarchal society that the #metoo movement protests.

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Nov 17th, 1:45 PM Nov 17th, 2:00 PM

A Study of Midwifery Care as Resistance to Patriarchy

C158

During the last two centuries, it has been common practice for typically male doctors to deliver babies in a hospital. Some hospitals boast high levels of clinical births, with cesarean section rates rising over time. South Miami hospital tops the list and recently reported having delivered more babies by cesarean section than vaginally during the year, with the percentage reaching 51% cesarean and 49% vaginal. As a result, many women are feeling safer birthing at home than in the hospital and are turning from the hospital during pregnancy and birth as a form of resistance to the patriarchal model of medicine. This can be seen in the rising number of out-of-hospital births - the CDC reports that the percentage has been steadily rising since 2004 and currently accounts for around 1.5% of births.

Amidst the recent #metoo movement, the study focused on a local midwifery practice and looked into the individual reasons that women are turning to the women-centered practice of midwifery for well-woman care and natural home birth. It found that most women who had turned to this kind of care had witnessed or heard stories of clinical hospital births that were not pleasant and, in some cases, even considered to be ‘birth rape’. Just as the #metoo movement is bringing about protests and boycotts in other areas, it is bringing it to the birth and women’s health care world as men are being rejected from the birthing room.

Parallels are drawn to the ‘red tent’ of early civilizations and some current ones in Africa, which were designed for women to gather without men during menstruation, birth, and the postpartum period.