Presentation Title

The Role of Cultural and Neighborhood Factors on Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Mothers of Mexican Descent

Presenter Information

Mayra Leal, CSU San MarcosFollow

Faculty Mentor

Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Exclusive breastfeeding for six months is a common recommendation from healthcare organizations as it allots the greatest health benefits for both the mother and child. However, stress during the perinatal period is associated with earlier breastfeeding cessation. Mexican-American women, the fast growing minority group in the US, experience high levels of psychosocial and sociocultural stressors as such as acculturation, social support, and cultural trends, may influence breastfeeding practices. Additionally, environmental factors, such as neighborhood opportunity, contribute to stress and thus may also impact breastfeeding practices among these mothers. Our study investigated whether the cultural factors and neighborhood factors predicted initiation of exclusive breastfeeding at birth. In addition, we addressed the ability of cultural and neighborhood factors to predict sustained exclusive breastfeeding from birth to six months. The participants consisted of 238 pregnant women of Mexican descent recruited from a local clinic during the first trimester. The women completed questionnaires at birth and then again at six months that addressed acculturation, acculturative stress, and discrimination along with demographic information. Mothers also reported infant feeding practices at birth and again at six months. Mothers who experienced higher acculturative stress were 2.40% less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (p<0.001) and 1.52% less likely at 6 months (p<0.001). Additionally mothers who experienced higher perceived discrimination were less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (R2= 0.381, B= -8.428, OR= .000, CI= .000 - 0.003, p < .001). Neither acculturative stress, acculturation, discrimination nor neighborhood factors predicted sustained feeding. Further research should attempt to ameliorate stress associated with declines in exclusive breastfeeding and whether physiological changes may be influencing breastfeeding behaviors.

Summary of research results to be presented

Mothers who experienced higher acculturative stress were 2.40% less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (p<0.001) and 1.52% less likely at 6 months (p<0.001). Additionally mothers who experienced higher perceived discrimination were less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (R2= 0.381, B= -8.428, OR= .000, CI= .000 - 0.003, p < .001). Neither acculturative stress (R2= 0.148, B= 0.267, OR= 1.306, CI= .978 - 1.743, p= 0.07), acculturation (Mexican Orientation: R2= 0.428, B=-0.438. OR= 0.646, CI= 0.279 - 1.495, p=0.307; Anglo Orientation: R2= 0.256, B= -0.230, OR= 0.795, CI= 0.481 - 1.312, p= 0.368), discrimination (R2= 1.323, B= -2.344, OR= 0.096, CI= 0.007 - 1.284, p= 0.077) nor neighborhood factors predicted sustained feeding.

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Nov 17th, 2:00 PM Nov 17th, 2:15 PM

The Role of Cultural and Neighborhood Factors on Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Mothers of Mexican Descent

C151

Exclusive breastfeeding for six months is a common recommendation from healthcare organizations as it allots the greatest health benefits for both the mother and child. However, stress during the perinatal period is associated with earlier breastfeeding cessation. Mexican-American women, the fast growing minority group in the US, experience high levels of psychosocial and sociocultural stressors as such as acculturation, social support, and cultural trends, may influence breastfeeding practices. Additionally, environmental factors, such as neighborhood opportunity, contribute to stress and thus may also impact breastfeeding practices among these mothers. Our study investigated whether the cultural factors and neighborhood factors predicted initiation of exclusive breastfeeding at birth. In addition, we addressed the ability of cultural and neighborhood factors to predict sustained exclusive breastfeeding from birth to six months. The participants consisted of 238 pregnant women of Mexican descent recruited from a local clinic during the first trimester. The women completed questionnaires at birth and then again at six months that addressed acculturation, acculturative stress, and discrimination along with demographic information. Mothers also reported infant feeding practices at birth and again at six months. Mothers who experienced higher acculturative stress were 2.40% less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (p<0.001) and 1.52% less likely at 6 months (p<0.001). Additionally mothers who experienced higher perceived discrimination were less likely to initiate exclusive breastfeeding at birth (R2= 0.381, B= -8.428, OR= .000, CI= .000 - 0.003, p < .001). Neither acculturative stress, acculturation, discrimination nor neighborhood factors predicted sustained feeding. Further research should attempt to ameliorate stress associated with declines in exclusive breastfeeding and whether physiological changes may be influencing breastfeeding behaviors.