Presentation Title

Do Parental Drinking and Approval of Drinking affect College Students Drinking Tendencies?

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The rate of alcohol consumption and tendency to drink among young adults attending college continues to grow in recent years (Messler, Lee, Randal, & Simons, 2014). Numerous factors have been attributed to college student drinking, such as peer influence, gender, race, coping mechanisms, and parenting (Lee, Messler, Randal, & Simons, 2014). Among these factors, Crano, Donaldson, and Handren (2016) found parental drinking and parental approval of drinking significantly predicted alcohol consumption in young adults. Murphy, Sullivan, O‘Donovan, Hope, and Davoren (2016) found similar results in regards to Crano’s study; parental approval and parental drinking predicted drinking tendencies in children. The current study seeks to replicate these results by investigating whether drinking tendency in college students significantly differs based on parental drinking and approval of their children's drinking by using data from the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (Wechsler, 2001). Drinking tendency was operationalized as a combination of five variables related to the number of drinks consumed and the number of drinks necessary to feel drunk. Results from a two-way ANOVA indicated that there was a significant interaction between parental approval and parental drinking factors, as well as a significant main effect of parental drinking. Parental drinking significantly predicted increased drinking tendencies in children, and parental approval significantly interacted with this effect by further increasing tendencies. When parents disapproved of drinking, but still drank themselves, the effect of parental drinking was lessened. The findings encourage us to expand research focus to parents that drink but do not approve of drinking, as parental approval on its own was not a significant factor in reducing alcohol consumption.

Summary of research results to be presented

The current study seeks to replicate these results by investigating whether drinking tendency in college students significantly differs based on parental drinking and approval of their children's drinking by using data from the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (Wechsler, 2001). Drinking tendency was operationalized as a combination of five variables related to the number of drinks consumed and the number of drinks necessary to feel drunk. Results from a two-way ANOVA indicated that there was a significant interaction between parental approval and parental drinking factors, as well as a significant main effect of parental drinking. Parental drinking significantly predicted increased drinking tendencies in children, and parental approval significantly interacted with this effect by further increasing tendencies. When parents disapproved of drinking, but still drank themselves, the effect of parental drinking was lessened.

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Nov 17th, 2:00 PM Nov 17th, 2:15 PM

Do Parental Drinking and Approval of Drinking affect College Students Drinking Tendencies?

C153

The rate of alcohol consumption and tendency to drink among young adults attending college continues to grow in recent years (Messler, Lee, Randal, & Simons, 2014). Numerous factors have been attributed to college student drinking, such as peer influence, gender, race, coping mechanisms, and parenting (Lee, Messler, Randal, & Simons, 2014). Among these factors, Crano, Donaldson, and Handren (2016) found parental drinking and parental approval of drinking significantly predicted alcohol consumption in young adults. Murphy, Sullivan, O‘Donovan, Hope, and Davoren (2016) found similar results in regards to Crano’s study; parental approval and parental drinking predicted drinking tendencies in children. The current study seeks to replicate these results by investigating whether drinking tendency in college students significantly differs based on parental drinking and approval of their children's drinking by using data from the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (Wechsler, 2001). Drinking tendency was operationalized as a combination of five variables related to the number of drinks consumed and the number of drinks necessary to feel drunk. Results from a two-way ANOVA indicated that there was a significant interaction between parental approval and parental drinking factors, as well as a significant main effect of parental drinking. Parental drinking significantly predicted increased drinking tendencies in children, and parental approval significantly interacted with this effect by further increasing tendencies. When parents disapproved of drinking, but still drank themselves, the effect of parental drinking was lessened. The findings encourage us to expand research focus to parents that drink but do not approve of drinking, as parental approval on its own was not a significant factor in reducing alcohol consumption.