Presentation Title

Criminalization and Medicalization of Drug Use: Analytical Discourse on Two International Perspectives and Narratives

Faculty Mentor

Julie Collins-Dogrul

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

Location

C158

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Substance use disorder, commonly referred to as drug addiction, has been an extremely controversial issue within most countries with dissimilar opinions about possible solutions, ranging from punishment to treatment. In this research I engage in an analytical discourse and explore the underlying assumptions and consequences of both the penalization and medicalization of substance use disorder through a transatlantic, historical parallel of the “The War on Drugs”, in the United States, and the appearance of drug consumption rooms (DCR’S) throughout Europe. The theoretical drive of the discussion is a synthesis of the Durkheimian conscience collective and constructivist social problem theory which produces an analytical tool to explain the ontological characteristics of both perspectives. The main conclusion of the comparison postulates that the motivated claimsmaking process of the U.S. Government and the advocates of DCR’S, reshaped their respective society’s core beliefs and values on drug addiction, thus a part of their conscience collective, to achieve their own purposes, political power on the one hand and medicalization on the other. Above all, I propose that there is an ongoing shift in perspectives occurring around the issue of substance use disorder where the perspective of medicalization is gaining a wider popularity with more DCRs opening around the world, taking initiative even in the United States where penalization has a firm, recent historical background.

Summary of research results to be presented

The research has concluded that the different approaches to substance use disorder, criminalization by the U.S. Government and medicalization by European proponents of DCR's, are largely motivated by personal-political reasons which are channeled in a claims-making process towards greater society. This claims-making process, in turn, not only pushes for a certain set of solutions for the issue but by doing so it pushes a certain set of ideas to frame the issue. These ideas are used to change the perspective of their audiences which can be defined as a shift in the Durkheimian conscience collective. Historical media data on both sides suggests that this process is highly organized and rationally mediated. The final conclusion of the research shows how political bodies consciously and rationally evaluate, arrange and execute a shift in the conscience collective of their respective target audiences, which often include nationwide groups.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 2:00 PM Nov 17th, 2:15 PM

Criminalization and Medicalization of Drug Use: Analytical Discourse on Two International Perspectives and Narratives

C158

Substance use disorder, commonly referred to as drug addiction, has been an extremely controversial issue within most countries with dissimilar opinions about possible solutions, ranging from punishment to treatment. In this research I engage in an analytical discourse and explore the underlying assumptions and consequences of both the penalization and medicalization of substance use disorder through a transatlantic, historical parallel of the “The War on Drugs”, in the United States, and the appearance of drug consumption rooms (DCR’S) throughout Europe. The theoretical drive of the discussion is a synthesis of the Durkheimian conscience collective and constructivist social problem theory which produces an analytical tool to explain the ontological characteristics of both perspectives. The main conclusion of the comparison postulates that the motivated claimsmaking process of the U.S. Government and the advocates of DCR’S, reshaped their respective society’s core beliefs and values on drug addiction, thus a part of their conscience collective, to achieve their own purposes, political power on the one hand and medicalization on the other. Above all, I propose that there is an ongoing shift in perspectives occurring around the issue of substance use disorder where the perspective of medicalization is gaining a wider popularity with more DCRs opening around the world, taking initiative even in the United States where penalization has a firm, recent historical background.