Presentation Title

Predictors of Drug Related Behavior Among Ethnic Minorities

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Despite the rapid growth of Asian Americans and research on alcohol and substance abuse, there are only few research done on the association between the two. Attention may be deferred from Asian Americans because previous findings have shown that this group has consistently lower rates of alcohol or drug related tendencies compared to other ethnic groups (Kim, Kim, & Nochajski, 2010). However, findings from Kim et al. (2010) suggest that there is actually an increase in risk factors for alcohol use disorder among the Asian American population. Those risk factors include higher years in education, active religious participation, and greater ethnic identity – all of which were thought to be factors that protect individuals from alcohol abuse. Thus, the current study aimed to look at the factors influencing an increase in alcohol abuse among Filipino Americans. The study examined whether ethnic pride and age at immigration were significant predictors of alcohol abuse by using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Study (Takeuchi, 1995-1999). Ethnic pride was measured using a 14-item questionnaire that asked about how prideful they felt in their Filipino culture. Questions about alcohol abuse were measure using a 7-item questionnaire that asked questions regarding alcohol consumption yearly, weekly, and monthly. Contrary to what was expected, the current findings showed that ethnic pride and age of immigration did not significantly predict alcohol abuse. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to coping mechanisms that involve alcohol abuse in relation to coping. In addition, the presentation of the present study provides information about how secondary analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

The current study aimed to look at the factors influencing an increase in alcohol abuse among Filipino Americans. The study examined whether ethnic pride and age at immigration were significant predictors of alcohol abuse by using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Study (Takeuchi, 1995-1999). Ethnic pride was measured using a 14-item questionnaire that asked about how prideful they felt in their Filipino culture. Questions about alcohol abuse were measure using a 7-item questionnaire that asked questions regarding alcohol consumption yearly, weekly, and monthly. Contrary to what was expected, the current findings showed that ethnic pride and age of immigration did not significantly predict alcohol abuse. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to coping mechanisms that involve alcohol abuse in relation to coping.

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Nov 17th, 2:15 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Predictors of Drug Related Behavior Among Ethnic Minorities

C151

Despite the rapid growth of Asian Americans and research on alcohol and substance abuse, there are only few research done on the association between the two. Attention may be deferred from Asian Americans because previous findings have shown that this group has consistently lower rates of alcohol or drug related tendencies compared to other ethnic groups (Kim, Kim, & Nochajski, 2010). However, findings from Kim et al. (2010) suggest that there is actually an increase in risk factors for alcohol use disorder among the Asian American population. Those risk factors include higher years in education, active religious participation, and greater ethnic identity – all of which were thought to be factors that protect individuals from alcohol abuse. Thus, the current study aimed to look at the factors influencing an increase in alcohol abuse among Filipino Americans. The study examined whether ethnic pride and age at immigration were significant predictors of alcohol abuse by using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Study (Takeuchi, 1995-1999). Ethnic pride was measured using a 14-item questionnaire that asked about how prideful they felt in their Filipino culture. Questions about alcohol abuse were measure using a 7-item questionnaire that asked questions regarding alcohol consumption yearly, weekly, and monthly. Contrary to what was expected, the current findings showed that ethnic pride and age of immigration did not significantly predict alcohol abuse. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to coping mechanisms that involve alcohol abuse in relation to coping. In addition, the presentation of the present study provides information about how secondary analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.