Presentation Title

How Christian faith influences Tobacco use Amongst College Students

Faculty Mentor

Chong Ho Yu

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:45 PM

Location

C151

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The effects of tobacco use have been well-documented for many years, but it still remains the leading cause of preventable deaths. There is very little known or spoken about the impact of Christianity on smoking-choice. The objective of this research project is to examine whether there is a significant relationship between the status of Christian faith and tobacco use. In this study, the status of Christian faith is classified by whether one keeps the religious belief or/and participates in religious activities regularly. Tobacco use includes usage of cigarettes, cigars, water pipe, and electronic cigarettes. Based upon the data collected from a Southwestern private Christian University in 2015 (n = 435), the research team utilized Chi-square analysis and data visualization to investigate whether students who are actively involved with their faith are less susceptible to smoking than students who are not. It was found that students who have Christian faith and attend church regularly are less likely to use tobacco. However, this protective effect was not observed among students who have doubt about their faith, who have faith but do not attend church regularly, and who gave up their faith and no longer attend church. It is important to point out that their answers to their faith status and tobacco use are obtained simultaneously in the same survey, rather than in a temporal sequence. Hence, at most it is a correlational study. This study by no means implies that there is a cause and effect relationship between these two variables.

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Nov 17th, 2:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:45 PM

How Christian faith influences Tobacco use Amongst College Students

C151

The effects of tobacco use have been well-documented for many years, but it still remains the leading cause of preventable deaths. There is very little known or spoken about the impact of Christianity on smoking-choice. The objective of this research project is to examine whether there is a significant relationship between the status of Christian faith and tobacco use. In this study, the status of Christian faith is classified by whether one keeps the religious belief or/and participates in religious activities regularly. Tobacco use includes usage of cigarettes, cigars, water pipe, and electronic cigarettes. Based upon the data collected from a Southwestern private Christian University in 2015 (n = 435), the research team utilized Chi-square analysis and data visualization to investigate whether students who are actively involved with their faith are less susceptible to smoking than students who are not. It was found that students who have Christian faith and attend church regularly are less likely to use tobacco. However, this protective effect was not observed among students who have doubt about their faith, who have faith but do not attend church regularly, and who gave up their faith and no longer attend church. It is important to point out that their answers to their faith status and tobacco use are obtained simultaneously in the same survey, rather than in a temporal sequence. Hence, at most it is a correlational study. This study by no means implies that there is a cause and effect relationship between these two variables.