Presentation Title

The US-Japan Bond: American Military Presence in Japan

Faculty Mentor

Joon S. Kil

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:45 PM

Location

C153

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This paper examines the US’s journey towards recovering its war-torn relationship with Japan, and Japan’s reception to its efforts. Although the US had invested considerably more to the alliance than Japan did due to its vested interests in gaining geopolitical advantage in East Asia, the pressure for Japan to extend its part of the deal eventually came with Japan’s rapid economic growth. While the US exerted a significant amount of influence to the demilitarization of Japan, it has also taken steps to safeguard Japan’s security with various forms of military aid. The disparity in the efforts that each country has put into the alliance has caused some to criticize Japan for being a so-called free-rider in the deal, but the Japanese refute the allegation by claiming that they have been absolved of the lack of providing military support by providing vast sums of bilateral aid to American allies. In the empirical data that I have observed, citizens of both countries have continually displayed a great deal of mutual confidence to the alliance, while the level of trust from both sides seems to have plateaued from mutual complacency. Empirical data also notes China to be the object of mutual distrust from both US and Japan, reinforcing the US-Japan security bond. The interests that both countries have maintained towards one another are no longer clear, but rather imminent to change.

Summary of research results to be presented

These are the four independent variables to my research. Since research in the field of Political Science is mainly comprised of analyzing scholarly writings, the independent variables are also considered to be the hypothesis and result.

  1. Mutual Public Trust

  2. US provides security to a demilitarized Japan

  3. Japan shares US aid burden

  4. Check China’s power

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Nov 17th, 2:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:45 PM

The US-Japan Bond: American Military Presence in Japan

C153

This paper examines the US’s journey towards recovering its war-torn relationship with Japan, and Japan’s reception to its efforts. Although the US had invested considerably more to the alliance than Japan did due to its vested interests in gaining geopolitical advantage in East Asia, the pressure for Japan to extend its part of the deal eventually came with Japan’s rapid economic growth. While the US exerted a significant amount of influence to the demilitarization of Japan, it has also taken steps to safeguard Japan’s security with various forms of military aid. The disparity in the efforts that each country has put into the alliance has caused some to criticize Japan for being a so-called free-rider in the deal, but the Japanese refute the allegation by claiming that they have been absolved of the lack of providing military support by providing vast sums of bilateral aid to American allies. In the empirical data that I have observed, citizens of both countries have continually displayed a great deal of mutual confidence to the alliance, while the level of trust from both sides seems to have plateaued from mutual complacency. Empirical data also notes China to be the object of mutual distrust from both US and Japan, reinforcing the US-Japan security bond. The interests that both countries have maintained towards one another are no longer clear, but rather imminent to change.