Presentation Title

Aged Fathers at the Higher Risk of Transferal of Genetic Diseases

Presenter Information

Sundas ShaikhFollow
John WuFollow

Faculty Mentor

John Wu

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C155

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In the last five years, it has been seen that as the couples are planning children at later years in their life genetic diseases among children are becoming common. In the recent studies, it has been assumed that more than that of a mother the age of a father is playing a larger role in the transmission of the genetic diseases. The intention of the study is to inquire why the aged man are at a higher risk of transferring genetic diseases to their offsprings? The extensive study was carried out for the research focusing on the development of cells and how sperms typically behave. The results underscore the fact that in men sperms are produced constantly whereas in women the number of eggs is limited. Every time a sperm is produced it goes through mitosis and meiosis which increases the number of mutations. Furthermore, there are two cells in men that are responsible for the production of healthy sperms. These two are Sertoli cells and Leydig cells. Sertoli cells are the cells in the testes that play a supporting role in the development of sperm cells. Whereas, Leydig cells are located in the connective tissue surrounding the seminiferous tubules and they are responsible for manufacturing testosterone. Over time, as men age, the production of these cells are lowered and eventually, the body ceases to manufacture them. As a result of this termination, the defective sperms are produced which contains mutations that are fatal. When these defective sperms contribute to the genetic makeup of an offspring, the child is then exposed to diseases like Autism and Schizophrenia. The study corroborates the hypothesis that men with older age have more genetic mutations in their cells and therefore are at a higher risk of transferring these mutations to their children.

Summary of research results to be presented

The result of the research suggests that men with the higher age could be the cause of the genetic diseases of their offsprings because of the higher rate of gene mutation in the sperm cells. As the production of the sperm is continuous, therefore there are more chances of mutations occurring in them because of the process of mitosis and meiosis that copies the genes and divide the cells. Moreover, cells like Sertoli cells and Leydig cells which are responsible for the nourishments cease to produce in the older years of a man’s life which leads to defective sperms. These defective sperms can then become a major cause of the transferral of genetic diseases to the offsprings. The study does depict that one way to prevent the transmission of genetic disease to the offspring is that to have a child at an early age so that the complications can be avoided. Because if a genetic disease such as Schizophrenia is running in the family and a man of that family decides to have a child at the age of forty then there is a higher risk that the dishes would be transferred to his children.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

Aged Fathers at the Higher Risk of Transferal of Genetic Diseases

C155

In the last five years, it has been seen that as the couples are planning children at later years in their life genetic diseases among children are becoming common. In the recent studies, it has been assumed that more than that of a mother the age of a father is playing a larger role in the transmission of the genetic diseases. The intention of the study is to inquire why the aged man are at a higher risk of transferring genetic diseases to their offsprings? The extensive study was carried out for the research focusing on the development of cells and how sperms typically behave. The results underscore the fact that in men sperms are produced constantly whereas in women the number of eggs is limited. Every time a sperm is produced it goes through mitosis and meiosis which increases the number of mutations. Furthermore, there are two cells in men that are responsible for the production of healthy sperms. These two are Sertoli cells and Leydig cells. Sertoli cells are the cells in the testes that play a supporting role in the development of sperm cells. Whereas, Leydig cells are located in the connective tissue surrounding the seminiferous tubules and they are responsible for manufacturing testosterone. Over time, as men age, the production of these cells are lowered and eventually, the body ceases to manufacture them. As a result of this termination, the defective sperms are produced which contains mutations that are fatal. When these defective sperms contribute to the genetic makeup of an offspring, the child is then exposed to diseases like Autism and Schizophrenia. The study corroborates the hypothesis that men with older age have more genetic mutations in their cells and therefore are at a higher risk of transferring these mutations to their children.