Presentation Title

Effect of locality on aggressive behavior in the invasive species, Procambarus clarkii

Faculty Mentor

Lee Kats, William Ota

Start Date

18-11-2017 1:45 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:00 PM

Location

9-255

Session

Bio Sciences 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The ability for species to recognize individuals from the same community can alter wasteful displays of competition that decrease individuals’ fitness. Currently the invasive species, Procambarus clarkii (crayfish), inhabit freshwater streams in the Santa Monica mountains. Their effectiveness as an invader is highlighted in their interspecific and intraspecific aggressive nature. Previous studies that have investigated these intraspecific aggressive interactions have found factors such as size, sex, and hunger to be influential in the levels of aggression that crayfish exert towards one another. However, no study has looked at how a difference in locality might affect these types of interactions. Consequently, this study determined if locality affects Procambarus clarkii intraspecific aggression. We placed two crayfish in a tub filled with just carbon filtered water. We scored aggressive interactions between the crayfish; the higher the score, the more aggressive the interactions. We found that a difference in origin causes crayfish to be more aggressive towards one another. The difference in score between crayfish of same and different origin was significantly different as P < 0.0001.

Summary of research results to be presented

I found that a difference in origin causes crayfish to be more aggressive towards each other. The average aggression score for crayfish of a different origin was 2.49, while the score for crayfish of the same origin was 1.61. I ran a T-test on these data and found the P value to be less than 0.0001, deeming this difference as significant. In addition, we looked at how the amount of time spent in the tubs affected the levels of aggression between crayfish. We found that crayfish aggression rose as time in the tub increased. Overall, for interactions between crayfish of the same site, and crayfish of a different site, the average aggression increased at a linear rate with time, in minutes. We were unable to find a peak in the crayfish aggression for the time spent in the tubs which was 5 minutes. When observing the relationship between time and aggression, we ran t-tests between the different time intervals, and found significance between each minute interval except for the 1-2 minute interval.

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Nov 18th, 1:45 PM Nov 18th, 2:00 PM

Effect of locality on aggressive behavior in the invasive species, Procambarus clarkii

9-255

The ability for species to recognize individuals from the same community can alter wasteful displays of competition that decrease individuals’ fitness. Currently the invasive species, Procambarus clarkii (crayfish), inhabit freshwater streams in the Santa Monica mountains. Their effectiveness as an invader is highlighted in their interspecific and intraspecific aggressive nature. Previous studies that have investigated these intraspecific aggressive interactions have found factors such as size, sex, and hunger to be influential in the levels of aggression that crayfish exert towards one another. However, no study has looked at how a difference in locality might affect these types of interactions. Consequently, this study determined if locality affects Procambarus clarkii intraspecific aggression. We placed two crayfish in a tub filled with just carbon filtered water. We scored aggressive interactions between the crayfish; the higher the score, the more aggressive the interactions. We found that a difference in origin causes crayfish to be more aggressive towards one another. The difference in score between crayfish of same and different origin was significantly different as P < 0.0001.