Presentation Title

Evaluation and Investigation of Drivers Involved in Motor Vehicle Collisions Under the Influence of Drugs at the Emergency Department of UC Irvine Medical Center

Faculty Mentor

Chakravarthy, Bharath

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

Location

9-255

Session

Bio Sciences 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Objective: While there has been a decrease in the overall trend of driving under the influence of alcohol, there has been a positive trend in driving under the influence of drugs. This finding was previously underscored by standard urine toxicology screens, suggesting that the lack of research and resources available to address this trend drives the need to determine the population “at risk” for motor vehicle accidents. It is also paramount to implement effective screening and prevention programs for those who are driving under the influence of drugs other than alcohol.

Methods: The study will be comparing serum toxicology data with urine toxicology screens of the trauma patients of the UCI Medical Center who are drivers aged 18 and older involved in motor vehicle collisions. Demographic information will be collected to determine the “at risk” population in Orange County and determine the most commonly used drugs and drug concentrations in 900 patients.

Results: THC was the most common drug present in the blood toxicology data. Patients self identified as black or African American had the highest percent of THC present in blood samples, Asians were the lowest. Males showed a greater risk of driving under the influence of drugs than females. There was a significantly higher percent of younger drivers who tested positive for THC in blood samples.

Conclusion: Serum toxicology is a feasible screening tool to use in a level 1 trauma center to identify the presence of drugs and drug concentrations of drivers involved in motor vehicle accidents.

Summary of research results to be presented

One or more drugs were detected in 29.9% of samples (95% confidence interval [CI] 24.9-35.4%). Approximately 25% of drivers aged 15-19 and 26% of patients aged 20-29 had presence of THC in blood. 75% of Black drivers had significant THC presence in their blood toxic, patients with Asian ethnicity had the lowest. THC was detected in 16.0% of samples (95% CI 12.2-20.7%), opiates detected in 8.3% (95% CI 5.6-12.1%), cocaine detected in 1.4%(95% CI 5.0-11.3%), alcohol detected in 30.8%(95% CI 25.6- 36.6%). ≥ 1 drugs were detected in 35.7% of males (95% CI 29.1%-42.9%)and 19.8% of females (95% CI 13.328.5%, p= 0.004).

THC was the most common drug present in the blood toxicology data. Patients self identified as black or African American had the highest percent of THC present in blood samples, Asians were the lowest. Males showed a greater risk of driving under the influence of drugs than females. There was a significantly higher percent of younger drivers who tested positive for THC in blood samples.Therefore, serum toxicology is a feasible screening tool to use in a level 1 trauma center to identify the presence of drugs and drug concentrations of drivers involved in motor vehicle accidents.

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Nov 18th, 11:15 AM Nov 18th, 11:30 AM

Evaluation and Investigation of Drivers Involved in Motor Vehicle Collisions Under the Influence of Drugs at the Emergency Department of UC Irvine Medical Center

9-255

Objective: While there has been a decrease in the overall trend of driving under the influence of alcohol, there has been a positive trend in driving under the influence of drugs. This finding was previously underscored by standard urine toxicology screens, suggesting that the lack of research and resources available to address this trend drives the need to determine the population “at risk” for motor vehicle accidents. It is also paramount to implement effective screening and prevention programs for those who are driving under the influence of drugs other than alcohol.

Methods: The study will be comparing serum toxicology data with urine toxicology screens of the trauma patients of the UCI Medical Center who are drivers aged 18 and older involved in motor vehicle collisions. Demographic information will be collected to determine the “at risk” population in Orange County and determine the most commonly used drugs and drug concentrations in 900 patients.

Results: THC was the most common drug present in the blood toxicology data. Patients self identified as black or African American had the highest percent of THC present in blood samples, Asians were the lowest. Males showed a greater risk of driving under the influence of drugs than females. There was a significantly higher percent of younger drivers who tested positive for THC in blood samples.

Conclusion: Serum toxicology is a feasible screening tool to use in a level 1 trauma center to identify the presence of drugs and drug concentrations of drivers involved in motor vehicle accidents.