Presentation Title

Risk of Distraction in Trauma

Faculty Mentor

Cristobal Barrios, Shahram Lotfipour

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

Location

9-255

Session

Bio Sciences 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Distracted transport contributes to increased safety risks on the road. Driving while diverted with smartphones increases crash risks 4-23 times and is responsible for 22% of motor vehicle incidents. Pedestrian distraction has also shown raised levels of danger by increasing crossing times and unsafe crossing behavior. Therefore, analysis to better comprehend distraction trends among all participants in a transportation related incident is needed to improve public safety. In this ongoing prospective study, the incidence of distraction for all forms of transport was gathered through a 10 question in-person survey of adult trauma victims in the Level 1 Trauma Center of the University of California, Irvine Medical Center (UCIMC) within the Emergency Department. The survey examined eligible patients about their age, gender, ethnicity, education level, mode of injury, role in the incident they were involved in, and any interference with their focus on the road. Predominance of distraction was determined by patient’s role in the accident: driver, passenger, pedestrian, bicyclist, and motorcyclist. Logistic regression was also done to identify risk factors for distraction. Of the 233 patients who fully completed the survey, no statistically significant difference was found when comparing the number of distracted and non-distracted individuals for all variables. The logistic regression indicated risk factors for distraction to be possession of an advanced degree and being male. Ultimately, distraction is prevalent among all victims of traffic accidents with male patients and patients with advanced degrees more likely to be distracted. In the future, further detailed and specified analysis is needed to not only verify this data and conclusion, but to target more high risk distractions for certain modes of transportation and populations for improved public safety.

Summary of research results to be presented

From June 2016 to September 2017, 684 patients were surveyed, and 233 (34.1%) patients completed the entire survey. Overall, 56 (10.1%) patients reported distraction, including 35 (63.0%) drivers, 3 (5.40%) passengers, 5 (8.90%) pedestrians, 9 (16.1%) bicyclists, and 4 (7.10%) motorcyclists were distracted. Of those, 3 (5.40%) were 18-19 year olds, 19 (34.0%) were 20-29 year olds, 12 (21.4%) were 30-39 year olds, 8 (14.3%) were 40-49 year olds, 7 (13.0%) were 50-64 year olds, and 7 (13.0%) were 64 and older patients. 37 (66.0%) were distracted males and 19 (33.9%) were distracted females. In addition, 21 (37.5%) were Latino, 21 (37.5%) were Caucasian, 3 (5.36%) were African American, 10 (17.9%) were Asian, 1 (1.79%) was Native American. Lastly, 1 (1.79%) had no schooling, 3 (5.36%) completed elementary school, 22 (39.3%) completed high school, 7 (12.5%) completed some college, 6 (10.7%) completed two year college, 7 (12.5%) completed four year college, 5 (8.92%) completed their master’s degree, 3 (5.36%) completed professional school, and 2 (3.57%) completed their doctorate degree. There were no significant differences between distracted and not-distracted patients with respect to all variables. Male gender (OR=2.41; CI 1.1-5.28, p=0.029) and presence of advanced degree (OR=6.11; CI 1.80-20.71, p=0.004) were significant risk factors for distraction.

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Nov 18th, 11:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:15 AM

Risk of Distraction in Trauma

9-255

Distracted transport contributes to increased safety risks on the road. Driving while diverted with smartphones increases crash risks 4-23 times and is responsible for 22% of motor vehicle incidents. Pedestrian distraction has also shown raised levels of danger by increasing crossing times and unsafe crossing behavior. Therefore, analysis to better comprehend distraction trends among all participants in a transportation related incident is needed to improve public safety. In this ongoing prospective study, the incidence of distraction for all forms of transport was gathered through a 10 question in-person survey of adult trauma victims in the Level 1 Trauma Center of the University of California, Irvine Medical Center (UCIMC) within the Emergency Department. The survey examined eligible patients about their age, gender, ethnicity, education level, mode of injury, role in the incident they were involved in, and any interference with their focus on the road. Predominance of distraction was determined by patient’s role in the accident: driver, passenger, pedestrian, bicyclist, and motorcyclist. Logistic regression was also done to identify risk factors for distraction. Of the 233 patients who fully completed the survey, no statistically significant difference was found when comparing the number of distracted and non-distracted individuals for all variables. The logistic regression indicated risk factors for distraction to be possession of an advanced degree and being male. Ultimately, distraction is prevalent among all victims of traffic accidents with male patients and patients with advanced degrees more likely to be distracted. In the future, further detailed and specified analysis is needed to not only verify this data and conclusion, but to target more high risk distractions for certain modes of transportation and populations for improved public safety.