Presentation Title

Analyzing morphological variation among honey bee (Apis mellifera) individuals with different foraging behaviors on watermelon flowers (Citrullus lanatus)

Faculty Mentor

Joan Leong

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

Location

9-271

Session

Bio Sciences 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Analyzing morphological variation among honey bee (Apis mellifera) individuals with different foraging behaviors on watermelon flowers (Citrullus lanatus)

By Marisol Torres

Abstract

Adult honey bees spend the last few weeks of their life span foraging on flowers for pollen and/or nectar. A typical bee’s foraging behavior at a flower is usually a single visit per individual flower, during a brief period of time. However, there have been field observations of honey bees visiting an individual flower repeatedly during a brief period of time (revisitation). My study asks if there are morphological differences between individuals that exhibit these two different behavioral patterns on watermelon flowers. This research focuses on gathering qualitative and quantitative data from both single visiting and revisiting honeybees from two different sites to compare their wing wear. Wings are part of an insect that do not regenerate so as insects age, they accumulate wing wear. The scoring method is scoring how much wing wear a wing has from 0-6, six being the most wear and tear. The other measurement is a quantitative measurement by placing a line that starts at the angle that bisects right below the marginal cell to the end of the wing’s margin. For site #1, Prime Times Ranch, the results showed revisiting honeybees had more wing wear damage then single visiting honeybees. For site #2, Spadra Ranch, some preliminary results showed that there was no difference between the revisiting and single visiting honeybees.

Keywords: Honeybees, Morphology, Revisiting behavior, Watermelon flowers, Wing wear damage

Summary of research results to be presented

For site #1, Prime Times Ranch, the results showed revisiting honeybees had more wing wear damage then single visiting honeybees. For site #2, Spadra Ranch, some preliminary results showed that there was no difference between the revisiting and single visiting honeybees.

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Nov 18th, 11:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:15 AM

Analyzing morphological variation among honey bee (Apis mellifera) individuals with different foraging behaviors on watermelon flowers (Citrullus lanatus)

9-271

Analyzing morphological variation among honey bee (Apis mellifera) individuals with different foraging behaviors on watermelon flowers (Citrullus lanatus)

By Marisol Torres

Abstract

Adult honey bees spend the last few weeks of their life span foraging on flowers for pollen and/or nectar. A typical bee’s foraging behavior at a flower is usually a single visit per individual flower, during a brief period of time. However, there have been field observations of honey bees visiting an individual flower repeatedly during a brief period of time (revisitation). My study asks if there are morphological differences between individuals that exhibit these two different behavioral patterns on watermelon flowers. This research focuses on gathering qualitative and quantitative data from both single visiting and revisiting honeybees from two different sites to compare their wing wear. Wings are part of an insect that do not regenerate so as insects age, they accumulate wing wear. The scoring method is scoring how much wing wear a wing has from 0-6, six being the most wear and tear. The other measurement is a quantitative measurement by placing a line that starts at the angle that bisects right below the marginal cell to the end of the wing’s margin. For site #1, Prime Times Ranch, the results showed revisiting honeybees had more wing wear damage then single visiting honeybees. For site #2, Spadra Ranch, some preliminary results showed that there was no difference between the revisiting and single visiting honeybees.

Keywords: Honeybees, Morphology, Revisiting behavior, Watermelon flowers, Wing wear damage