Presentation Title

Tricuspid Annular Plane of Systolic Excursion for the Assessment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (TAAPE)

Faculty Mentor

John Fox, Shadi Lahham

Start Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:45 PM

Location

9-273

Session

Bio Sciences 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Objective:

Acute pulmonary embolism (aPE) is a condition that can lead to death if not quickly identified. The current standard of care for the evaluation of aPE includes a Computed Tomography scan of the Pulmonary Arteries (CTPA). However, many patients are unable to undergo this test due to renal disease, pregnancy, or risk of radiation. Ultrasonography has shown promise in obtaining the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) measurements to help make the diagnosis. Our objective is to determine if TAPSE measurements can be used to diagnose patients with aPE.

Methods:

We prospectively enrolled patients who presented to the Emergency Department with a suspicion of aPE between November 2015 and July 2017. This study consists of a comparative analysis of three cohorts of patients based on the results from the gold standard (CTPA scan). Patients were grouped into 3 categories, no PE, clinically insignificant PE, and clinically significant PE.

Results:

A total of 87 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 12 (14%) were found to have clinically significant aPE, 10 (12%) were found to have clinically insignificant PE, and 65 (74%) were found to not have a PE. Of the patients with clinically significant aPE, 58.3% were found to have TAPSE value less than 16mm, whereas patients with clinically insignificant PE or no PE, only 10% and 3% of patients were found to have TAPSE values less than 16mm respectively. The average TAPSE values for patients with clinically significant aPE was 14.37 mm, clinically insignificant PE was 21.19mm and no PE was 22.73 mm.

Conclusion:

TAPSE measurements may be useful in identifying patients with clinically significant aPE compared to those with a clinically insignificant PE or no PE.

Summary of research results to be presented

A total of 87 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 12 (14%) were found to have clinically significant aPE, 10 (12%) were found to have clinically insignificant PE, and 65 (74%) were found to not have a PE. Of the patients with clinically significant aPE, 58.3% were found to have TAPSE value less than 16mm, whereas patients with clinically insignificant PE or no PE, only 10% and 3% of patients were found to have TAPSE values less than 16mm respectively. The average TAPSE values for patients with clinically significant aPE was 14.37 mm, clinically insignificant PE was 21.19mm and no PE was 22.73 mm.

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Nov 18th, 1:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:45 PM

Tricuspid Annular Plane of Systolic Excursion for the Assessment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (TAAPE)

9-273

Objective:

Acute pulmonary embolism (aPE) is a condition that can lead to death if not quickly identified. The current standard of care for the evaluation of aPE includes a Computed Tomography scan of the Pulmonary Arteries (CTPA). However, many patients are unable to undergo this test due to renal disease, pregnancy, or risk of radiation. Ultrasonography has shown promise in obtaining the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) measurements to help make the diagnosis. Our objective is to determine if TAPSE measurements can be used to diagnose patients with aPE.

Methods:

We prospectively enrolled patients who presented to the Emergency Department with a suspicion of aPE between November 2015 and July 2017. This study consists of a comparative analysis of three cohorts of patients based on the results from the gold standard (CTPA scan). Patients were grouped into 3 categories, no PE, clinically insignificant PE, and clinically significant PE.

Results:

A total of 87 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 12 (14%) were found to have clinically significant aPE, 10 (12%) were found to have clinically insignificant PE, and 65 (74%) were found to not have a PE. Of the patients with clinically significant aPE, 58.3% were found to have TAPSE value less than 16mm, whereas patients with clinically insignificant PE or no PE, only 10% and 3% of patients were found to have TAPSE values less than 16mm respectively. The average TAPSE values for patients with clinically significant aPE was 14.37 mm, clinically insignificant PE was 21.19mm and no PE was 22.73 mm.

Conclusion:

TAPSE measurements may be useful in identifying patients with clinically significant aPE compared to those with a clinically insignificant PE or no PE.