Presentation Title

**Garlic’s (Allium sativum) immunomodulatory abilities in macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide or Candida albicans** Exemplary Presentation

Faculty Mentor

Nancy Buckley

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:15 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 9:30 AM

Location

9-273

Session

Bio Sciences 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Prior to the advent of modern medical practices, historical cultures used the properties of plants to combat illness. The usage of one such plant, garlic (Allium sativum), for medical treatment has been documented by ancient Greek and Roman societies, and continues to be a home remedy. Therefore, an underlying necessity exists to understand garlic’s biological effects against ailment and disease. One such recipient of garlic’s biological effects are macrophages; when triggered by pathogens, macrophages secrete signals known as cytokines. Two such pathogens are lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a gram-negative bacterial membrane component, or Candida albicans (C. albicans), an opportunistic fungus. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an essential cytokine in triggering the inflammatory response of the body. Recently, our lab has shown that garlic increases TNF-α secretion in LPS stimulated J774A.1 (J7) and reduces TNF-α secretion in C. albicans stimulated J7 macrophages. The objective of this study is to compare the effects of garlic on three cell types: J7, RAW 264.7 and thioglycollate-induced macrophages. Macrophages are harvested, plated, and stimulated with LPS or C. albicans in the absence or presence of garlic. Following challenge and treatment, the cells are harvested and TNF-α is analyzed by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Our results show that the effects of garlic on J7, RAW, and primary macrophages stimulated with LPS or C. albicans are cell line and challenge dependent. This demonstrates that garlic has an ability to modulate macrophage function in response to pathogen challenge.

Summary of research results to be presented

We have found that garlic stimulates the TNF-α secretion in lipopolysaccharide stimulated J774A.1 and male and female thioglycollate-induced macrophages, but has no significant effect in RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, we have found that garlic decreases the TNF-α secretion in Candida albicans stimulated J774A.1, RAW 264.7, and male and female thioglycollate-induced macrophages. These results show that the effects of garlic are dependent on the cell line and the immune challenge.

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Nov 18th, 9:15 AM Nov 18th, 9:30 AM

**Garlic’s (Allium sativum) immunomodulatory abilities in macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide or Candida albicans** Exemplary Presentation

9-273

Prior to the advent of modern medical practices, historical cultures used the properties of plants to combat illness. The usage of one such plant, garlic (Allium sativum), for medical treatment has been documented by ancient Greek and Roman societies, and continues to be a home remedy. Therefore, an underlying necessity exists to understand garlic’s biological effects against ailment and disease. One such recipient of garlic’s biological effects are macrophages; when triggered by pathogens, macrophages secrete signals known as cytokines. Two such pathogens are lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a gram-negative bacterial membrane component, or Candida albicans (C. albicans), an opportunistic fungus. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an essential cytokine in triggering the inflammatory response of the body. Recently, our lab has shown that garlic increases TNF-α secretion in LPS stimulated J774A.1 (J7) and reduces TNF-α secretion in C. albicans stimulated J7 macrophages. The objective of this study is to compare the effects of garlic on three cell types: J7, RAW 264.7 and thioglycollate-induced macrophages. Macrophages are harvested, plated, and stimulated with LPS or C. albicans in the absence or presence of garlic. Following challenge and treatment, the cells are harvested and TNF-α is analyzed by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Our results show that the effects of garlic on J7, RAW, and primary macrophages stimulated with LPS or C. albicans are cell line and challenge dependent. This demonstrates that garlic has an ability to modulate macrophage function in response to pathogen challenge.