Presentation Title

The effects in an ammonium addition on bacterial succession and the nitrification process in a newly established low complexity (no fish, no plants) aquaponics system

Faculty Mentor

Adriane Jones, Diane Kim

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:45 AM

Location

9-277

Session

Bio Sciences 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Aquaponics systems are semi closed ecosystems in which fish input nitrogen as ammonia waste products, bacteria complete the nitrification process (ammonia-nitrite-nitrate) and plants uptake the usable nitrate for growth. Compared to traditional farming aquaponics systems use less fertilizer and have a smaller water footprint. In this study we explored the nitrification process and bacterial communities in a newly installed system, first as low complexity system (no fish and no plants) and second after plants were added. We artificially spiked the system with 15 grams of ammonia chloride and monitored the nitrification process using sensors, colorimetric, and spectrophotometric methods; and the microbial community using extracted chlorophyll, cells counts, and 16S rDNA sequencing over the course of a month. We clearly saw the rapid succession of the nitrification process and drawdown of nitrate once plants were added.Microscopy and chlorophyll concentrations indicated a community shift of the planktonic microbes through time, even though cell counts remained fairly constant. Preliminary results indicate a change in the microbiome over the course of the experiment. The fish tank water contained members of the genus Granulosicoccus spp. (20-30%), Oscillochloris spp. (5-3%) and Phenylobacterium spp.(1-9%). Bacteria are critical to the optimal functioning of aquaponics systems and understanding their community dynamics is key to enhancing system performance.

Summary of research results to be presented

The rapid succession of the nitrification process and drawdown of nitrate occurred once plants were added.Microscopy and chlorophyll concentrations indicated a community shift of the planktonic microbes through time, even though cell counts remained fairly constant.Preliminary results of 16S sequencing indicate a change in the microbiome over the course of the experiment. The fish tank water contained members of the genus Granulosicoccus spp. (20-30%), Oscillochloris spp. (3-5%) and Phenylobacterium spp.(1-9%).

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Nov 18th, 11:30 AM Nov 18th, 11:45 AM

The effects in an ammonium addition on bacterial succession and the nitrification process in a newly established low complexity (no fish, no plants) aquaponics system

9-277

Aquaponics systems are semi closed ecosystems in which fish input nitrogen as ammonia waste products, bacteria complete the nitrification process (ammonia-nitrite-nitrate) and plants uptake the usable nitrate for growth. Compared to traditional farming aquaponics systems use less fertilizer and have a smaller water footprint. In this study we explored the nitrification process and bacterial communities in a newly installed system, first as low complexity system (no fish and no plants) and second after plants were added. We artificially spiked the system with 15 grams of ammonia chloride and monitored the nitrification process using sensors, colorimetric, and spectrophotometric methods; and the microbial community using extracted chlorophyll, cells counts, and 16S rDNA sequencing over the course of a month. We clearly saw the rapid succession of the nitrification process and drawdown of nitrate once plants were added.Microscopy and chlorophyll concentrations indicated a community shift of the planktonic microbes through time, even though cell counts remained fairly constant. Preliminary results indicate a change in the microbiome over the course of the experiment. The fish tank water contained members of the genus Granulosicoccus spp. (20-30%), Oscillochloris spp. (5-3%) and Phenylobacterium spp.(1-9%). Bacteria are critical to the optimal functioning of aquaponics systems and understanding their community dynamics is key to enhancing system performance.