Presentation Title

Using the DIVER Microscope for Deep Tissue Imaging

Faculty Mentor

Alexander Dvornikov, Suman Ranjit

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

Location

9-277

Session

Bio Sciences 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

A persistent problem in the medical community is not having the ability to scan deep tissue without removing or damaging tissue. The DIVER microscope, which combines use of a wide area photodetector and a matching refractive index in optical path, may be a solution. Tests using the DIVER microscope on tissue-like-rubber containing fluorescent beads, yielded results that encourages the development of better methods and technologies for deep tissue scanning. The DIVER microscope was able to image 4mm deep into the mock-tissue, which is deeper than the capabilities of similar technologies. Therefore, findings from this research project supports the continuing development of deep tissue imaging utilizing two photon microscopy, wide area photodetector, and matching refractive index in optical path.

Summary of research results to be presented

The Deep Imaging Via Emission Recovery (DIVER) microscope is a unique microscope utilizing two-photon microscopy with a wide area photo detector and a matching refractive index to image deep tissue without damaging or removing tissue. This microscope is unlike basic microscopes because it utilizes two photons instead of one. The photon must have enough energy to emit fluorescence, however it excites everything in its path which creates blurry results. The two low-energy photons stacked atop of each other reach the energy requirement to emit fluorescence without exciting areas though its path, allowing accuracy and clarity. It also utilizes a wide area photo detector and matches the refractive index, making it unique. Photons are scattered when imaging, so in order to capture the optical amount of photons, the refractive index is matched in order to minimize photons lost through reflections and a wide area photodetector is used to collect scattered photons from a wide area of sample surface. The DIVER microscope was tested on 4mm tissue-like-rubber sample to demonstrate the capabilities of the microscope and imaged fluorescence 2-sized beads. This depth surpasses the capability of similar technologies. Anything with fluorescent properties can be imaged using the DIVER microscope. Using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) Imaging, we can image the collagen in fibrotic tissue. Third Harmonic Generation (THG) Imaging was used to image the lipid droplets in mice liver. These techniques utilizing the DIVER microscope allowed us to take images of the tissue without extracting actual tissue.

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Nov 18th, 11:15 AM Nov 18th, 11:30 AM

Using the DIVER Microscope for Deep Tissue Imaging

9-277

A persistent problem in the medical community is not having the ability to scan deep tissue without removing or damaging tissue. The DIVER microscope, which combines use of a wide area photodetector and a matching refractive index in optical path, may be a solution. Tests using the DIVER microscope on tissue-like-rubber containing fluorescent beads, yielded results that encourages the development of better methods and technologies for deep tissue scanning. The DIVER microscope was able to image 4mm deep into the mock-tissue, which is deeper than the capabilities of similar technologies. Therefore, findings from this research project supports the continuing development of deep tissue imaging utilizing two photon microscopy, wide area photodetector, and matching refractive index in optical path.