Presentation Title

Understanding the Role of Fabrication Method on Metal Alloys Used in Nuclear Power Plants

Faculty Mentor

Janelle Wharry

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

Location

9-243

Session

Engineering/CS 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Current nuclear reactor components consist of forged or casted Iron-based or Nickel-based alloys. Both these fabrication techniques present challenges in long-term performance and structural integrity. A possible alternative investigated in this research includes Powder Metallurgy (PM) combined with Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). Our group focused on how both fabrication techniques resulted in changes for hardness and grain structure growth after samples were heat treated at 400 oC, 600 oC, and 800oC for 100, 1000, and 10000 hours.

Summary of research results to be presented

Cast 690 Nickel Alloy resulted in a decrease in average grain size as temperatures increased from room temperature to 400oC, 600 oC, and 800 oC for 100 hours. Powder Metallurgy combined with Hot Isostatic Pressing 690 Nickel Alloy samples showed a general increase in the average grain size as the temperature increased from room temperature to 400oC, 600 oC, and 800 oC for 100 hours. Trends in hardness for Cast 690 Nickel Alloy remained stable when heat treated from room temperature to 400oC, 600 oC, and 800 oC for 100 hours. Powder Metallurgy combined with Hot Isostatic Pressing samples showed a decrease in hardness when heated treated from room temperature to 400oC, 600 oC, and 800 oC for 100 hours.

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Nov 18th, 2:00 PM Nov 18th, 2:15 PM

Understanding the Role of Fabrication Method on Metal Alloys Used in Nuclear Power Plants

9-243

Current nuclear reactor components consist of forged or casted Iron-based or Nickel-based alloys. Both these fabrication techniques present challenges in long-term performance and structural integrity. A possible alternative investigated in this research includes Powder Metallurgy (PM) combined with Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). Our group focused on how both fabrication techniques resulted in changes for hardness and grain structure growth after samples were heat treated at 400 oC, 600 oC, and 800oC for 100, 1000, and 10000 hours.