Presentation Title

Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) Modeling of an Engineering Facility

Faculty Mentor

Kevin R Anderson

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

9-243

Session

Engineering/CS 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Modeling and simulation of buildings is important to reach energy conservations goals in the upcoming decades, since approximately 30% of wasted energy is attributable to poor building energy engineering design practices. This paper presents the results of a case study of building energy modeling of an existing university engineering building. The energy modeling focuses on the current building existing configuration, followed by a retrofit study of what is needed to reach Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) status for the same facility. The building energy model simulations are guided by American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) practices the use of state-of-the-art HVAC equipment in order to meet the NZEB target. The use of renewable energy technologies (PV, solar thermal, etc.) in the retrofit simulation are used to demonstrate how an offset of the building’s current CO2 footprint can be realized. Results from the software packages eQUEST and TRACE are given in this paper illustrating how building loads are obtained from each simulation software tool. The paper will demonstrate how the Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database can be utilized as a reliable guide to determine how a building’s energy demand varies (cooling load, heating load, lighting, ventilation, misc. loads) as compared to similar buildings in California. Engineering economic analysis of the proposed building retrofits are also included in the paper.

Summary of research results to be presented

1. Building Energy Consumption

  • Baseline electricity consumption: 1,112,844 kWh

  • Estimated HVAC Airside: 390,000 kWh

  • Baseline Energy Use Intensity (EUI) (EUI is the energy use per square foot at a property (energy divided by square foot). The EUI enables energy engineers to compare different sized buildings.): Here, EUI = 11.71 kWh/sqft-yr

  • CEUS EUI: 12.26 kWh/sqft-yr

  • Percent error in EUI as compared to CEUS database = 4.5%

2. Energy Conservation Measures

  • Building Electricity Savings: 363,300 kWh 32% of baseline

  • Average Peak Demand Savings: 30 kW

3. Solar Alternative Renewable Energy Retrofit

  • PV on 40% of the roof

  • Initial cost: $ 427,000

  • Installed Cost: $1.11/W

  • Annual electricity generation: 852,144 kWh

  • Excess generation credit earned: 731,187 kWh

  • Nominal Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): 5.1 ¢/kWh

4. Engineering Economic Return on Investment (ROI) Analysis shows

  • Building Electricity Savings: 363,300 kWh 32% of baseline

  • Cost of Retrofit: $653,803

  • Utility Rate: Time of Use, General Service, Off-peak/on-Peak

  • Payback Cash Flow Payback Period = 5.7 years

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Nov 18th, 10:45 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) Modeling of an Engineering Facility

9-243

Modeling and simulation of buildings is important to reach energy conservations goals in the upcoming decades, since approximately 30% of wasted energy is attributable to poor building energy engineering design practices. This paper presents the results of a case study of building energy modeling of an existing university engineering building. The energy modeling focuses on the current building existing configuration, followed by a retrofit study of what is needed to reach Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) status for the same facility. The building energy model simulations are guided by American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) practices the use of state-of-the-art HVAC equipment in order to meet the NZEB target. The use of renewable energy technologies (PV, solar thermal, etc.) in the retrofit simulation are used to demonstrate how an offset of the building’s current CO2 footprint can be realized. Results from the software packages eQUEST and TRACE are given in this paper illustrating how building loads are obtained from each simulation software tool. The paper will demonstrate how the Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database can be utilized as a reliable guide to determine how a building’s energy demand varies (cooling load, heating load, lighting, ventilation, misc. loads) as compared to similar buildings in California. Engineering economic analysis of the proposed building retrofits are also included in the paper.