Presentation Title

Seepage Velocity in Partially Saturated Clayey Slopes with Different Relative Compactions

Faculty Mentor

Beena Ajmera, Binod Tiwari

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 10:15 AM

Location

9-243

Session

Engineering/CS 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

One of the major factors responsible for triggering landslides is rainfall. In this study, the impact of relative compaction, a parameter describing the density of the slope material, on the seepage velocity or rate of infiltration of rainwater was examined. To do so, two model slopes were prepared in a Plexiglas container to have an inclination of 40 degrees with different relative compactions. Rainfall was then applied using a rain simulator system and continued until the slopes were completely saturated. The location of the wetting front was recorded in 20 minute increments during the application of the rainfall. The results showed that slopes with lower relative compactions had a higher seepage velocity and therefore experienced more movement. Whereas, the slope with a higher relative compaction had a lower seepage velocity and therefore experienced a less significant movement of soil. The findings indicated that the slope with higher relative compaction is more stable than slope in which the material is relatively loose.

Summary of research results to be presented

Based on the changes in soil density, the two models had different results. The first model had a higher soil density, which was achieved by using less soil in the second model and by lowering the relative compaction by 10%. The tensiometers that were placed in the slope were fully saturated more rapidly in the second model than that of the first. All the tensiometers in the first model were fully saturated after around 3 hours, while the tensiometers in the second model took only around 2 hours and 24 minutes. This represents how there was a greater seepage velocity in the second model compared to the first one. The saturation lines on the right, left, and front sides of the models also represent the slower seepage velocity in the second model. On average, the saturation lines had a difference of 40 minutes between the full saturation of both slopes. In addition, the copper wires that were placed in the slope for the second model had much more deformation than that of the first model due to the weak stability of the slope in the second model. Furthermore, this caused multiple fissures in the second model. In conclusion, as the soil density decreased, the water seepage velocity increased, and the stability of the slope decreased.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 10:15 AM

Seepage Velocity in Partially Saturated Clayey Slopes with Different Relative Compactions

9-243

One of the major factors responsible for triggering landslides is rainfall. In this study, the impact of relative compaction, a parameter describing the density of the slope material, on the seepage velocity or rate of infiltration of rainwater was examined. To do so, two model slopes were prepared in a Plexiglas container to have an inclination of 40 degrees with different relative compactions. Rainfall was then applied using a rain simulator system and continued until the slopes were completely saturated. The location of the wetting front was recorded in 20 minute increments during the application of the rainfall. The results showed that slopes with lower relative compactions had a higher seepage velocity and therefore experienced more movement. Whereas, the slope with a higher relative compaction had a lower seepage velocity and therefore experienced a less significant movement of soil. The findings indicated that the slope with higher relative compaction is more stable than slope in which the material is relatively loose.