Presentation Title

Designing a tri-helical magnetically induced micro actuator

Faculty Mentor

Paul Dixon

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

Location

9-245

Session

Engineering/CS 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The goal of this project is to create an induced-magnetization actuator with high power density capability. The actuator is intended to allow for both linear and rotary actuation; depending on the pitch angle of the helical structure and the application of physics constraints. Electrically, the actuator acts as a simple three-phase motor, using three helical wires as the stator coils and a helically structured high magnetic-susceptible paramagnetic material (soft iron) as the rotor. Various methods and materials have been tested in the process of creating this actuator in an attempt to optimize the wire gauge, rotor structure, particle size, and the particle binder. Using a mixture of a slow curing epoxy and fine iron powder with a ratio ~ 1:1, the rotor has been created out of a capillary tube by adding this mixture and applying a large current through one of the wrapped helical wires in-situ while the epoxy cured. With each iteration of the actuator design, improvements have been made, while at the same time, new problems have been discovered. We will present the basic design, the development process, and the current status of the prototype.

Summary of research results to be presented

In the process of creating the rotor for this actuator, several grains of iron, different kinds of epoxies, and various diameters of capillary tubing were tested in an attempt to find the optimal materials needed for the actuator. By wrapping three magnetic wires around the rotor and passing current through one of them, we attempted to create a magnetically susceptible helical structure within the rotor. However, our first attempts were unsuccessful due improper ratios of iron to epoxy. After several attempts of creating this inner helical structure, the optimal ratio was found and the inner helical structure was achieved. However, the heavier particles of iron were settling towards the bottom of the rotor, when attempting to create the inner helical structure, due to gravitational forces. This was problematic because these particles of iron would disrupt the magnetization of our helical structure. To circumvent this problem, two concepts of distributing the forces of gravity throughout the rotor were created. The first concept did this by rocking the rotor while creating the inner helical structure. The second concept achieved this by continuously rotating the rotor while the inner helical structure was being created. Ultimately the second concept was heavily favored, not only did it distribute the gravitational forces evenly, but the centripetal force created by the rotation also helped in drawing the iron powder closer to the magnetic field produced by the magnetic wire. Our next goal is to achieve actuating motion, for this further research will be needed.

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Nov 18th, 11:15 AM Nov 18th, 11:30 AM

Designing a tri-helical magnetically induced micro actuator

9-245

The goal of this project is to create an induced-magnetization actuator with high power density capability. The actuator is intended to allow for both linear and rotary actuation; depending on the pitch angle of the helical structure and the application of physics constraints. Electrically, the actuator acts as a simple three-phase motor, using three helical wires as the stator coils and a helically structured high magnetic-susceptible paramagnetic material (soft iron) as the rotor. Various methods and materials have been tested in the process of creating this actuator in an attempt to optimize the wire gauge, rotor structure, particle size, and the particle binder. Using a mixture of a slow curing epoxy and fine iron powder with a ratio ~ 1:1, the rotor has been created out of a capillary tube by adding this mixture and applying a large current through one of the wrapped helical wires in-situ while the epoxy cured. With each iteration of the actuator design, improvements have been made, while at the same time, new problems have been discovered. We will present the basic design, the development process, and the current status of the prototype.