Presentation Title

**Adolescents’ Experiences of Loneliness at School** Exemplary Presentation

Faculty Mentor

Andrea Hopmeyer

Start Date

18-11-2017 4:20 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 4:30 PM

Location

BSC Ursa Major

Session

Exemplary

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This cross-sectional investigation examined whether students’ social and behavioral reputations among peers were correlated with their loneliness in different high school contexts, in effect testing the validity of using a situationally-dependent approach when examining loneliness. The participants were 284 (155 girls, 123 boys) high school students assessed in both ninth and tenth grade. Peer-report nominations at Time 1 were used to assess their behavioral reputations (overtly aggressive, relationally aggressive, overtly victimized, and relationally victimized), and social standing (popular, liked, unpopular, disliked). Self-report instruments at Time 2 were used to assess four contexts of participants’ loneliness (in class, in PE, between classes, and at lunch). Bivariate correlations showed that students’ self-reported loneliness was correlated across all four school contexts. Loneliness in class, in PE, and between classes was negatively correlated with liking; in class loneliness and PE loneliness was negatively correlated with popularity among peers, with PE loneliness and loneliness at lunch also positively correlated with unpopularity and overt victimization. Loneliness at lunch was additionally positively correlated with disliking and relational victimization. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of taking into account the importance of using a situationally dependent approach to assess loneliness in adolescence.

Summary of research results to be presented

Bivariate Correlation Analyses Correlations Between School Contexts

Students’ self-reported loneliness was correlated across all four school contexts.

Social and Behavioral Correlates of Loneliness

Loneliness in class was negatively correlated with liking and popularity among peers. Loneliness in PE was positively correlated with unpopularity and overt victimization and negatively correlated with liking and popularity among peers. Loneliness at lunch was positively correlated with disliking and unpopularity, as well as both overt and relational victimization among peers. Loneliness between classes was negatively correlated with liking among peers.

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Nov 18th, 4:20 PM Nov 18th, 4:30 PM

**Adolescents’ Experiences of Loneliness at School** Exemplary Presentation

BSC Ursa Major

This cross-sectional investigation examined whether students’ social and behavioral reputations among peers were correlated with their loneliness in different high school contexts, in effect testing the validity of using a situationally-dependent approach when examining loneliness. The participants were 284 (155 girls, 123 boys) high school students assessed in both ninth and tenth grade. Peer-report nominations at Time 1 were used to assess their behavioral reputations (overtly aggressive, relationally aggressive, overtly victimized, and relationally victimized), and social standing (popular, liked, unpopular, disliked). Self-report instruments at Time 2 were used to assess four contexts of participants’ loneliness (in class, in PE, between classes, and at lunch). Bivariate correlations showed that students’ self-reported loneliness was correlated across all four school contexts. Loneliness in class, in PE, and between classes was negatively correlated with liking; in class loneliness and PE loneliness was negatively correlated with popularity among peers, with PE loneliness and loneliness at lunch also positively correlated with unpopularity and overt victimization. Loneliness at lunch was additionally positively correlated with disliking and relational victimization. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of taking into account the importance of using a situationally dependent approach to assess loneliness in adolescence.