Presentation Title

**Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses** Exemplary Presentation

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers

Start Date

18-11-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 4:10 PM

Location

BSC Ursa Major

Session

Exemplary

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

During the summer 2017 field season Offering 1, from the Los Horcones site on the Southern Pacific Coast of Chiapas Mexico, was examined using a variety of approaches and techniques to extract a unique understanding of the artifacts contained within. The assemblage contained a number of surprisingly intact figurines, masks, and whistles, as well as two broken vessels. Recordings and transcriptions were made of the whistles to explore the variety, range, and implications of the sounds produced by these artifacts. It was discovered that the range of sounds was dependent on the method of playing the instrument, lung capacity, and body size and often embodied various avian sounds. Previously unexcavated dirt collected between the vessels revealed an undiscovered figurine whistle, becoming potentially the most important artifact contained within the offering. Reconstruction and examination of the vessels was undertaken as well as PXRF sourcing of the obsidian collected from the site and various illustrations. All objects were subsequently three-dimensionally scanned into digital format in an easily manipulable program to facilitate the examination of the artifacts without exacerbating degradation. This also allows the potential to replicate the objects via 3D printing hardware as well as maintain the safety of the original objects.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results of the research include an in-depth analysis of the artifacts discovered at the site of Los Horcones, Chiapas Mexico. Musical notations of the entire range of sounds of the dozens of whistles contained in the offering was performed by two experienced musicians and were transcribed accordingly. This allowed the recreation of an ancient musical scale performed by ancient peoples at the site. Further research uncovered iconographic implications in a previously undiscovered figurine/whistle believed to be connected to Mayan divinity. A technological aspect was also applied in research by the application of a Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (PXRF) machine to allow the chemical sourcing of obsidian found at the site in order to highlight the use of extensive trade networks in direct connection to Los Horcones including several areas of Guatemala and Central Mexico. 3D scanning was also performed to allow the examination of artifacts, facilitate conservation, and provide an easily accessible resource with 3d printing capabilities.

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Nov 18th, 4:00 PM Nov 18th, 4:10 PM

**Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses** Exemplary Presentation

BSC Ursa Major

During the summer 2017 field season Offering 1, from the Los Horcones site on the Southern Pacific Coast of Chiapas Mexico, was examined using a variety of approaches and techniques to extract a unique understanding of the artifacts contained within. The assemblage contained a number of surprisingly intact figurines, masks, and whistles, as well as two broken vessels. Recordings and transcriptions were made of the whistles to explore the variety, range, and implications of the sounds produced by these artifacts. It was discovered that the range of sounds was dependent on the method of playing the instrument, lung capacity, and body size and often embodied various avian sounds. Previously unexcavated dirt collected between the vessels revealed an undiscovered figurine whistle, becoming potentially the most important artifact contained within the offering. Reconstruction and examination of the vessels was undertaken as well as PXRF sourcing of the obsidian collected from the site and various illustrations. All objects were subsequently three-dimensionally scanned into digital format in an easily manipulable program to facilitate the examination of the artifacts without exacerbating degradation. This also allows the potential to replicate the objects via 3D printing hardware as well as maintain the safety of the original objects.