Presentation Title

Understanding the Right Relationship: The Indigenous Fight to Preserve the Filipino Land and Culture

Faculty Mentor

Emily Nanea Renteria

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

Location

15-1823

Session

Humanities 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

For millennia, indigenous Filipinos sustained thriving societies by maintaining a reciprocal relationship with the land. In the last few centuries, however, colonization, imperialism, and globalization have advanced resource exploitation, desecrating this “right relationship.” Today, indigenous Filipino communities are mobilizing to combat government and globalist entities who inflict violence to silence their detractors and who justify environmental racism with economic gain.

In response to the increasing environmental degradation caused by resource extractive industries, grassroot movements are arising throughout the Philippines. Peaceful demonstrations remain a popular method of advocating for racial and environmental justice. Some native peoples use litigation to defend their land and communities. Despite constitutional protections that acknowledge the indigenous right relationship with the land, President Duterte has authorized vigilante militarism to silence members of the aboriginal populations (“Philippine Initiatives,” “Philippines: A Rights”). While agencies, like the U.N., advocate for indigenous peoples, the Philippine government is complicit with the profit-centered goals of its globalist partners (The United Nations General Assembly). Rather than forgo profits, the government opts to violate their own people’s human rights and cultural lifeways.

Native peoples, not just in the Philippines, have historically been forced into silence by capitalist oppressors regarding the mistreatment of their ancestral lands. Today, they are banding together to say, “enough is enough.” Offering restitution and returning tribal sovereignty back to indigenous communities is the first step in reconciling environmental activism and social justice. Ultimately, honoring the right relationship is necessary in saving indigenous Filipinos from disappearing with the island’s biodiversity.

Works Cited

“Philippines: A Rights Agenda for President Duterte.” Human Rights Watch, Human Rights Watch, 30 Oct. 2016, www.hrw.org/news/2016/08/09/philippines-rights-agenda-president-duterte. Accessed 15 May 2017.

The United Nations General Assembly. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. 2007. Print.

Summary of research results to be presented

What is the right relationship between the responsible agents of environmental degradation and the indigenous Filipino populations? The agents responsible should treat the indigenous Filipinos with respect—inform them and get their consent for projects; consider the implications of the projects on their wellbeing (i.e. water supply, displacement, etc.) and compensate them for any losses; acknowledge the autonomy of each native Filipino tribe; and to cut the rate that those entities use up resources. Governments and globalist corporations and entities are powerful forces, but that does not entitle them to utilize their power to handicap indigenous communities from advancing as a people nor should they devalue them as human beings simply because their lifestyle is not really compatible with the land-abusing system of globalization. It is unjust that the Filipinos have to bare the social and economic costs of environmental degradation when all these other entities get to utilize the rich land of the Philippines and only get richer. Overall, indigenous Filipinos have been on the bad end of the relationship with globalization and its participants. Thus, there is an immediate need for those groups to be able to work with and observe the rights of the native Filipinos.

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Nov 18th, 9:45 AM Nov 18th, 10:00 AM

Understanding the Right Relationship: The Indigenous Fight to Preserve the Filipino Land and Culture

15-1823

For millennia, indigenous Filipinos sustained thriving societies by maintaining a reciprocal relationship with the land. In the last few centuries, however, colonization, imperialism, and globalization have advanced resource exploitation, desecrating this “right relationship.” Today, indigenous Filipino communities are mobilizing to combat government and globalist entities who inflict violence to silence their detractors and who justify environmental racism with economic gain.

In response to the increasing environmental degradation caused by resource extractive industries, grassroot movements are arising throughout the Philippines. Peaceful demonstrations remain a popular method of advocating for racial and environmental justice. Some native peoples use litigation to defend their land and communities. Despite constitutional protections that acknowledge the indigenous right relationship with the land, President Duterte has authorized vigilante militarism to silence members of the aboriginal populations (“Philippine Initiatives,” “Philippines: A Rights”). While agencies, like the U.N., advocate for indigenous peoples, the Philippine government is complicit with the profit-centered goals of its globalist partners (The United Nations General Assembly). Rather than forgo profits, the government opts to violate their own people’s human rights and cultural lifeways.

Native peoples, not just in the Philippines, have historically been forced into silence by capitalist oppressors regarding the mistreatment of their ancestral lands. Today, they are banding together to say, “enough is enough.” Offering restitution and returning tribal sovereignty back to indigenous communities is the first step in reconciling environmental activism and social justice. Ultimately, honoring the right relationship is necessary in saving indigenous Filipinos from disappearing with the island’s biodiversity.

Works Cited

“Philippines: A Rights Agenda for President Duterte.” Human Rights Watch, Human Rights Watch, 30 Oct. 2016, www.hrw.org/news/2016/08/09/philippines-rights-agenda-president-duterte. Accessed 15 May 2017.

The United Nations General Assembly. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. 2007. Print.