Presentation Title

Vietnam Redux: A Look at the Soviet-Afghan War

Faculty Mentor

Michaela Reaves

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:45 AM

Location

15-1823

Session

Humanities 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

The Soviet-Afghan War lasted from 1979-1989 and became a tremendous military and financial burden for the Soviet Union. The USSR’s incursion into Afghanistan began with southern border concerns and led to heavy investments into the regime in Kabul. Declassified CIA documents from the 1980’s recorded and evaluated these problems. Analysis of these documents proves that the heavy military investment of the Soviet government caused shortages in the USSR itself which led to civil unrest at home. Drug abuse among soldiers in Afghanistan, as well as the unwillingness of Soviet youth to fight in the war, led to additional problems in the member republics. Further exacerbating these problems was the resistance of Islamic fundamentalists, especially the United States funded Mujahedeen. These small cells of fighters harassed Soviet troops and led to a military stalemate, much like the one the United States faced twenty years later. In addition to the fighters in Afghanistan, the Muslims inside of the Soviet Union showed solidarity with the insurgents, causing further instability in the Soviet sphere.

Summary of research results to be presented

As history recorded, the CIA intelligence was accurate and the dissidence against the Soviet Government, coupled with the issue of religious fundamentalism, complicated the Soviet-Afghan War and contributed to the Soviet decline by the mid-eighties.

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Nov 18th, 11:30 AM Nov 18th, 11:45 AM

Vietnam Redux: A Look at the Soviet-Afghan War

15-1823

The Soviet-Afghan War lasted from 1979-1989 and became a tremendous military and financial burden for the Soviet Union. The USSR’s incursion into Afghanistan began with southern border concerns and led to heavy investments into the regime in Kabul. Declassified CIA documents from the 1980’s recorded and evaluated these problems. Analysis of these documents proves that the heavy military investment of the Soviet government caused shortages in the USSR itself which led to civil unrest at home. Drug abuse among soldiers in Afghanistan, as well as the unwillingness of Soviet youth to fight in the war, led to additional problems in the member republics. Further exacerbating these problems was the resistance of Islamic fundamentalists, especially the United States funded Mujahedeen. These small cells of fighters harassed Soviet troops and led to a military stalemate, much like the one the United States faced twenty years later. In addition to the fighters in Afghanistan, the Muslims inside of the Soviet Union showed solidarity with the insurgents, causing further instability in the Soviet sphere.