Presentation Title

Fitzgerald Finds Freedom through Gatsby

Presenter Information

Kelly TerjesenFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Darlene Rivas

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

Location

15-1828

Session

Humanities 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Murdered, framed, and betrayed, “Gatsby turned out alright in the end.” Many scholars argue that the fictional Jay Gatsby embodies his creator, F. Scott Fitzgerald; yet, I never understood why Fitzgerald would have Gatsby, theoretically a depiction of himself, meet such a tragic demise. Pondering this idea, I began my research into F. Scott Fitzgerald’s archives at Princeton University. Using personal correspondence, newspaper clippings that Fitzgerald had kept in diaries, and the novel itself, I saw many overlays between Gatsby and Fitzgerald. Then, after analyzing these materials, I drew the following conclusions. Yes, Gatsby does represent Fitzgerald, but he was an earlier version of Fitzgerald. Gatsby was a Fitzgerald prior to the author’s broken dreams and disillusionment. Fitzgerald was using Gatsby to repeat the past – but in the end to escape the hopelessness of broken dreams. So, when it was time for Gatsby to face his unfulfilled promises, Fitzgerald chose instead to relieve Gatsby of this pain and provide him with a merciful death.

Summary of research results to be presented

Murdered, framed, and betrayed, “Gatsby turned out alright in the end.” Many scholars argue that the fictional Jay Gatsby embodies his creator, F. Scott Fitzgerald; yet, I never understood why Fitzgerald would have Gatsby, theoretically a depiction of himself, meet such a tragic demise. Pondering this idea, I began my research into F. Scott Fitzgerald’s archives at Princeton University. Using personal correspondence, newspaper clippings that Fitzgerald had kept in diaries, and the novel itself, I saw many overlays between Gatsby and Fitzgerald. Then, after analyzing these materials, I drew the following conclusions. Yes, Gatsby does represent Fitzgerald, but he was an earlier version of Fitzgerald. Gatsby was a Fitzgerald prior to the author’s broken dreams and disillusionment. Fitzgerald was using Gatsby to repeat the past – but in the end to escape the hopelessness of broken dreams. So, when it was time for Gatsby to face his unfulfilled promises, Fitzgerald chose instead to relieve Gatsby of this pain and provide him with a merciful death.

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Nov 18th, 9:30 AM Nov 18th, 9:45 AM

Fitzgerald Finds Freedom through Gatsby

15-1828

Murdered, framed, and betrayed, “Gatsby turned out alright in the end.” Many scholars argue that the fictional Jay Gatsby embodies his creator, F. Scott Fitzgerald; yet, I never understood why Fitzgerald would have Gatsby, theoretically a depiction of himself, meet such a tragic demise. Pondering this idea, I began my research into F. Scott Fitzgerald’s archives at Princeton University. Using personal correspondence, newspaper clippings that Fitzgerald had kept in diaries, and the novel itself, I saw many overlays between Gatsby and Fitzgerald. Then, after analyzing these materials, I drew the following conclusions. Yes, Gatsby does represent Fitzgerald, but he was an earlier version of Fitzgerald. Gatsby was a Fitzgerald prior to the author’s broken dreams and disillusionment. Fitzgerald was using Gatsby to repeat the past – but in the end to escape the hopelessness of broken dreams. So, when it was time for Gatsby to face his unfulfilled promises, Fitzgerald chose instead to relieve Gatsby of this pain and provide him with a merciful death.