Presentation Title

Working on Los Angeles: Developing Vocational Labor Market Opportunities

Faculty Mentor

Christian B. Teeter, Ed.D.

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:30 PM

Location

15-1802

Session

Interdisciplinary 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Mount Saint Mary’s University, Los Angeles

Keck Scholar Research

Working on Los Angeles – Developing Vocational Labor Market Opportunities

Melanie Corral, Stephanie Hickman and Christian B. Teeter, Ed.D.

Abstract

In a comprehensive research study completed in summer 2017, Melanie Corral and Stephanie Hickman, with Professor Christian B. Teeter, analyzed workforce development trends, focusing on labor market issues and trends within K-12 and community college education to promote career tracks in professional trades. Utilizing a Social Capital theoretical framework, focused on the concept of institutional agency, the authors developed a set of recommendations to increase awareness of trades jobs careers for individuals not suited or inclined to complete a baccalaureate degree, suggesting that administrators and faculty could, to a greater extent, destigmatize the idea of not attending a four-year college, or the pursuit of professions that do not require a four year degree. In addition to the issue of a stigma associated with vocational education, the rise of middle skills, as well as limitations in outreach to local corporations that hire in the trades, were also major findings. The findings were reached after extensive secondary research and interviews with members of trade unions, K-12 administrators, college leaders, union officials, and the Office of the Mayor of Los Angeles. The study recommends a greater focus on counseling resources for students not attending a four-year college, enhanced partnerships with non-profit organizations that support vocational job tracks and apprenticeships, and increased outreach between K-12 school districts, community colleges, and local corporations to raise awareness of these career tracks. A greater focus in this area can grow career opportunities and elevate living standards for those who do not graduate from a four-year college.

Summary of research results to be presented

Mount Saint Mary’s University, Los Angeles

Keck Scholar Research

Melanie Corral, Stephanie Hickman, Christian B. Teeter, Ed.D.

Working on Los Angeles – Developing Vocational Labor Market Opportunities

Research Findings

Keck Scholars Melanie Corral and Stephanie Hickman, with Professor Christian B. Teeter, developed a comprehensive research study in summer 2017 focused on vocational labor markets in Los Angeles. The scholars desired to see what extent students were becoming aware of trade careers, when not completing a four-year college degree. The study has three major findings:

  • Significance and growth of Middle Skills.
  • Greater need for collaboration and outreach between corporations and K-12 school districts.
  • The stigma associated with vocational education and career tracks.

Workforce development professionals and secondary research demonstrated the large growth opportunities in middle skills area – job tracks which require more than a high school diploma but not a college degree.

A second finding, on limited collaboration with school districts, demonstrated some limitations in the opportunities to promote vocational tracks within K-12 system. Primary research did not yield a significant focus on promoting vocational job tracks to students who aren’t planning to or are unable to attend college.

Research yielded a concern about stigma for those who did not attend a four-year college. A more active promotion of trade careers tracks as a path to higher wages and living standards could work toward limiting the stigmatization that applies to non-college educational and job tracks.

Based on these findings, a set of recommendations was developed for consideration.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 2:30 PM

Working on Los Angeles: Developing Vocational Labor Market Opportunities

15-1802

Mount Saint Mary’s University, Los Angeles

Keck Scholar Research

Working on Los Angeles – Developing Vocational Labor Market Opportunities

Melanie Corral, Stephanie Hickman and Christian B. Teeter, Ed.D.

Abstract

In a comprehensive research study completed in summer 2017, Melanie Corral and Stephanie Hickman, with Professor Christian B. Teeter, analyzed workforce development trends, focusing on labor market issues and trends within K-12 and community college education to promote career tracks in professional trades. Utilizing a Social Capital theoretical framework, focused on the concept of institutional agency, the authors developed a set of recommendations to increase awareness of trades jobs careers for individuals not suited or inclined to complete a baccalaureate degree, suggesting that administrators and faculty could, to a greater extent, destigmatize the idea of not attending a four-year college, or the pursuit of professions that do not require a four year degree. In addition to the issue of a stigma associated with vocational education, the rise of middle skills, as well as limitations in outreach to local corporations that hire in the trades, were also major findings. The findings were reached after extensive secondary research and interviews with members of trade unions, K-12 administrators, college leaders, union officials, and the Office of the Mayor of Los Angeles. The study recommends a greater focus on counseling resources for students not attending a four-year college, enhanced partnerships with non-profit organizations that support vocational job tracks and apprenticeships, and increased outreach between K-12 school districts, community colleges, and local corporations to raise awareness of these career tracks. A greater focus in this area can grow career opportunities and elevate living standards for those who do not graduate from a four-year college.