Presentation Title

Martyrdom and the Influence on the Living as Analyzed in Satrapi's Persepolis

Faculty Mentor

Cynthia Headley

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 10:15 AM

Location

9-251

Session

Interdisciplinary 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

The radical use of Martyrdom is meant to promote the integration into a cause not easily identified. According to Orhek’s article of Interdependent self-construals mitigate the fear of death and augment the willingness to become a martyr, the author uses statistics to claim that individuals who identify into group are more willing to become a sacrifice to protect the beliefs of their group more than those who identified independently. In other articles such as Shalah Talebi’s From the Light of the Eyes to the Eyes of the Power: State and Dissident Martyrs in Post-Revolutionary Iran, the author claims that Martyrs were meant to stand such as sentinels and protect Iranian values. In each individual case, there are multitudes of ideas why Martyrs are used the way they are.

We look at the use of identification with Martyrdom and its implications in Marjane Satrapi’s The Complete Persepolis. The story revolving around Marji, a caricature meant to act out as Satrapi’s childhood self, describes the unique experiences a young girl witnesses throughout the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Throughout the novel, there is a constant stream of depictions of the purposes for which Martyrdom was used for. The graphic novel reveals the use of Martyrs as a way to encourage other individuals to join the cause of each side that is being fought for as the Martyr. In conclusion, Martyrs were used as a form of promotion for a cause not easily seen on the surface and is promoted in many different forms.

Summary of research results to be presented

Martyrs are presented in ways that affect the decisions and ideas of those living. In articles such as the one presented in Tablebi's article From the Light of the Eyes to the Eyes of the Power: State and Dissident Martyrs in Post-Revolutionary Iran, the author discusses the use of martyr figures to impose a surveillance tool to ensure the behaviors and thoughts of those living in Iran were in accordance to the beliefs of the ones in power. Edward Orheyk's article of Interdependent Self-Construals Mitigate the Fear of Death and Augment the Willingness to Become a Martyr states that people are more willing to die for a sense of identity within a group and have less anxiety towards the idea of death. Both topics are covered in Marjane Satrapi's The Complete Persepolis where it illustrates the kind of "being watched" feeling one may have when surrounded in conflict that cause them to change their behavior when under the eyes of their authorities or Martyrs. In addition, Satrapi discusses the idea of how martyrdom creates a sense of unity within a group to come together for a cause and can be a motivator for people to push through conflict, despite the knowledge that death is a possibility. Death influences the thoughts and behaviors of those who are alive and with the use of Martyrs as a model for the rest of the population, there will be change.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 10:15 AM

Martyrdom and the Influence on the Living as Analyzed in Satrapi's Persepolis

9-251

The radical use of Martyrdom is meant to promote the integration into a cause not easily identified. According to Orhek’s article of Interdependent self-construals mitigate the fear of death and augment the willingness to become a martyr, the author uses statistics to claim that individuals who identify into group are more willing to become a sacrifice to protect the beliefs of their group more than those who identified independently. In other articles such as Shalah Talebi’s From the Light of the Eyes to the Eyes of the Power: State and Dissident Martyrs in Post-Revolutionary Iran, the author claims that Martyrs were meant to stand such as sentinels and protect Iranian values. In each individual case, there are multitudes of ideas why Martyrs are used the way they are.

We look at the use of identification with Martyrdom and its implications in Marjane Satrapi’s The Complete Persepolis. The story revolving around Marji, a caricature meant to act out as Satrapi’s childhood self, describes the unique experiences a young girl witnesses throughout the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Throughout the novel, there is a constant stream of depictions of the purposes for which Martyrdom was used for. The graphic novel reveals the use of Martyrs as a way to encourage other individuals to join the cause of each side that is being fought for as the Martyr. In conclusion, Martyrs were used as a form of promotion for a cause not easily seen on the surface and is promoted in many different forms.