Presentation Title

Highly Accurate Positions of Asteroids Using Astrometry

Faculty Mentor

Paul McCudden

Start Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:45 PM

Location

9-279

Session

Physical Sciences 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Abstract— Astrometry is the measurement of positions in the sky, positions of asteroids, and satellites of the outer planets. We used the Astro Mechanics, Ritchey-Chretien reflecting, 0.6m telescope at Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) located in Wrightwood, CA. Equipped with a 4k CCD camera, (the ProLine4096x4096 imaging array with 9mu pixels), using 180 second exposures, we imaged the asteroids and outer satellites. We calculated two to three different positions of the asteroids, with different star fields, to best obtain positions. We obtained many different, accurate positions of asteroids, and the seeing conditions, which were noted and inputted, then calculated by the reduction program. We submit our data to the Minor Planet Center, and are used by the Solar System Dynamics (SSD) group at JPL. The data are also used for predicting occulting events. Through the execution of several Linux reduction programs and scripts, we reduce the data for the most accurate orbital positions.

Summary of research results to be presented

Our results gave us highly accurate positions of many asteroids and Near Earth Objects (NEO's), and this allows for more precise optical navigation, used by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for several missions. We also submit our data to the Minor Planet Center to join other data and observations. We observed several hundred asteroids over the period of two years. All the data are consistent and an improvement on past position data.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 1:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:45 PM

Highly Accurate Positions of Asteroids Using Astrometry

9-279

Abstract— Astrometry is the measurement of positions in the sky, positions of asteroids, and satellites of the outer planets. We used the Astro Mechanics, Ritchey-Chretien reflecting, 0.6m telescope at Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) located in Wrightwood, CA. Equipped with a 4k CCD camera, (the ProLine4096x4096 imaging array with 9mu pixels), using 180 second exposures, we imaged the asteroids and outer satellites. We calculated two to three different positions of the asteroids, with different star fields, to best obtain positions. We obtained many different, accurate positions of asteroids, and the seeing conditions, which were noted and inputted, then calculated by the reduction program. We submit our data to the Minor Planet Center, and are used by the Solar System Dynamics (SSD) group at JPL. The data are also used for predicting occulting events. Through the execution of several Linux reduction programs and scripts, we reduce the data for the most accurate orbital positions.