Presentation Title

An Optimized Microfluidic-Based Aluminum-Air Battery

Faculty Mentor

Frank Gomez

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:30 PM

Location

9-239

Session

Physical Sciences 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The design and optimization of an aluminum-air battery is described. Aluminum-air batteries are a viable source of alternative energy and are advantageous because they have a large theoretical specific energy, are low in cost, and environmentally friendly. The battery consists of a separator fabricated from agar, a biodegradable polymer from marine algae, doped with KOH. The concentration of agar and the electrolyte used were varied to obtain the maximum potential and current. The maximum current and power densities observed were 67.6 mA/cm2 and 5.34 mW/cm2, respectively. Batteries were connected in series and powered portable electronic devices, including digital watches and LEDs. Current work is focused on further developing the aluminum-air battery technology and in expanding its applications.

Summary of research results to be presented

The concentration of agar and the electrolyte used were varied to obtain the maximum potential and current. The maximum current and power densities observed were 67.6 mA/cm2 and 5.34 mW/cm2, respectively. Batteries were connected in series and powered portable electronic devices, including digital watches and LEDs. Current work is focused on further developing the aluminum-air battery technology and in expanding its applications.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 2:30 PM

An Optimized Microfluidic-Based Aluminum-Air Battery

9-239

The design and optimization of an aluminum-air battery is described. Aluminum-air batteries are a viable source of alternative energy and are advantageous because they have a large theoretical specific energy, are low in cost, and environmentally friendly. The battery consists of a separator fabricated from agar, a biodegradable polymer from marine algae, doped with KOH. The concentration of agar and the electrolyte used were varied to obtain the maximum potential and current. The maximum current and power densities observed were 67.6 mA/cm2 and 5.34 mW/cm2, respectively. Batteries were connected in series and powered portable electronic devices, including digital watches and LEDs. Current work is focused on further developing the aluminum-air battery technology and in expanding its applications.