Presentation Title

Applications of Precision Timing to a SUSY Search with Delayed Photons at the Compact Muon Solenoid

Faculty Mentor

Maria Spiropulu

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

Location

9-239

Session

Physical Sciences 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Applications of Precision Timing to a SUSY Search with Delayed Photons at the Compact Muon Solenoid

Author: Gillian Kopp, California Institute of Technology

Mentor: Maria Spiropulu, Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment records data from proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, test theories of supersymmetery (SUSY), and measure properties of known particles with higher precision. In order to fully exploit the sensitivity of the CMS experiment, the current detectors must be upgraded to mitigate the effects of the large number of pileup interactions that will be present in collisions at the high-luminosity LHC. New capabilities, such as precision timing measurements in calorimetric devices, have been shown to effectively mitigate the effects due to pileup, and are expected to benefit searches for new physics. We present results obtained using a dedicated silicon timing layer identical to that proposed for the High Granularity Calorimeter proposed by CMS. This timing layer (pico-sil detector) was tested with high energy electromagnetic showers produced by electrons at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. An outstanding time resolution of less than 16 ps was measured for a beam energy of 32 GeV. A simulation of a benchmark dark matter search is presented, and it is shown that the generated particle flight times can be faithfully reconstructed using the detector-level information. We thus demonstrate that the search can be performed and that its sensitivity is expected to improve with the time resolution attained by the calorimeter.

Summary of research results to be presented

I will present results from both a precision timing study with the picosecond silicon timing layer (model of the high granularity calorimeter) and a dark matter events simulation study. The precision timing study was conducted during the June 2016 test beam at Fermilab, and are analyzed to determine how timing information from detector pixels is optimally combined to result in the best time resolution. The optimum algorithm was determined to be a weighted combination of pixel time stamps, where the weighting is determined by the charge recorded in each pixel. The best time resolution measured was 15.9 ps, with a 32 GeV electron beam. From the dark matter simulation study demonstrating the applications of precision timing, I will present initial results from the Monte Carlo simulation of dark matter events (given by a few possible decay pathways), and demonstrate that the reconstructed information agrees with the generator information. In addition to these results, I will discuss the future work to further the dark matter search and the application of precision timing to similar searches for new physics.

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Nov 18th, 9:30 AM Nov 18th, 9:45 AM

Applications of Precision Timing to a SUSY Search with Delayed Photons at the Compact Muon Solenoid

9-239

Applications of Precision Timing to a SUSY Search with Delayed Photons at the Compact Muon Solenoid

Author: Gillian Kopp, California Institute of Technology

Mentor: Maria Spiropulu, Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment records data from proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, test theories of supersymmetery (SUSY), and measure properties of known particles with higher precision. In order to fully exploit the sensitivity of the CMS experiment, the current detectors must be upgraded to mitigate the effects of the large number of pileup interactions that will be present in collisions at the high-luminosity LHC. New capabilities, such as precision timing measurements in calorimetric devices, have been shown to effectively mitigate the effects due to pileup, and are expected to benefit searches for new physics. We present results obtained using a dedicated silicon timing layer identical to that proposed for the High Granularity Calorimeter proposed by CMS. This timing layer (pico-sil detector) was tested with high energy electromagnetic showers produced by electrons at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. An outstanding time resolution of less than 16 ps was measured for a beam energy of 32 GeV. A simulation of a benchmark dark matter search is presented, and it is shown that the generated particle flight times can be faithfully reconstructed using the detector-level information. We thus demonstrate that the search can be performed and that its sensitivity is expected to improve with the time resolution attained by the calorimeter.