Presentation Title

Learning Gains Through Science Demonstrations

Faculty Mentor

Julie Bray-Ali, Jessica Draper, Heather Jones

Start Date

18-11-2017 1:45 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:00 PM

Location

9-239

Session

Physical Sciences 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

This research was to look at science demonstrations as a way of conveying scientific concepts, as opposed to conventional teaching methods such as lecturing. This research was conducted to assess learning gains through experiencing a science demonstration pertaining to the ideal gas law, specifically the direct relationship between volume and temperature. This project is relevant to know if student environments would be more beneficial toward student learning if scientific demonstrations were utilized. Using liquid nitrogen and a balloon, the correlation between temperature and volume was presented. The audience was a mix of college students, parents, and children. They participated through the use of questions, clickers, and a small group discussion. The participants were asked four questions at the beginning of the presentation to assess their prior knowledge of the topic, followed by two questions at the end designed to assess their knowledge after the demonstration. If the participants answered 25% or less correctly on the first four questions and answered the last two questions correctly, those participants were considered as a potential learning gain. The sample size was ninety, twenty-three scored 25% or less on the first four questions. Thirteen of the twenty-three answered the last two questions correctly, with a 56.52% improvement. Data analysis indicated learning gains; however, having a larger sample size would significantly improve the accuracy of the results. At this time, other teaching methods have not been executed to compare to the visual demonstrations included in this specific research project.

Summary of research results to be presented

The weakness in this process is the sample size. A larger sample size would significantly improve the accuracy of the results; however, through the use of a science demonstration, specifically the direct relationship between volume and temperature, data analysis indicated learning gains.

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Nov 18th, 1:45 PM Nov 18th, 2:00 PM

Learning Gains Through Science Demonstrations

9-239

This research was to look at science demonstrations as a way of conveying scientific concepts, as opposed to conventional teaching methods such as lecturing. This research was conducted to assess learning gains through experiencing a science demonstration pertaining to the ideal gas law, specifically the direct relationship between volume and temperature. This project is relevant to know if student environments would be more beneficial toward student learning if scientific demonstrations were utilized. Using liquid nitrogen and a balloon, the correlation between temperature and volume was presented. The audience was a mix of college students, parents, and children. They participated through the use of questions, clickers, and a small group discussion. The participants were asked four questions at the beginning of the presentation to assess their prior knowledge of the topic, followed by two questions at the end designed to assess their knowledge after the demonstration. If the participants answered 25% or less correctly on the first four questions and answered the last two questions correctly, those participants were considered as a potential learning gain. The sample size was ninety, twenty-three scored 25% or less on the first four questions. Thirteen of the twenty-three answered the last two questions correctly, with a 56.52% improvement. Data analysis indicated learning gains; however, having a larger sample size would significantly improve the accuracy of the results. At this time, other teaching methods have not been executed to compare to the visual demonstrations included in this specific research project.