Presentation Title

Prandtl-m Deflection Sensors Implementation and Development of Gondola IMU System

Faculty Mentor

David Berger

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 92

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The Preliminary Research AerodyNamic Design to Land on Mars (PRANDTL-M) is a light-weight glider with a 2.5 ft. span. PRANDTL-M applies the successful research on proverse yaw and rudderless flight of the previous PRANDTL projects to potential flight on Mars. During its flight, PRANDTL-M will collect direct data of the Martian atmosphere and topography, information currently unavailable to NASA. The strict size and weight constraints of the PRANDTL-M require the avionics to be small, powerful, and able to perform at -850 F temperatures. The intent of this internship is to develop, fabricate, integrate and test a position sensor for PRANDTL-M’s control surfaces. This system uses C-based programming, an embedded microcontroller, and a variable resistor to get in-flight data on degree of deflection. This will confirm the successful communication between the servos operating the control surfaces and the flight controller. It will also verify that the elevons are able to hold commanded positions against aerodynamic forces in flight. To prepare for -850 F conditions, PRANDTL-M will undergo three environmental tests to confirm the avionics can withstand low temperatures and pressures. Then, PRANDTL-M will be ready for a 125,000 ft. weather balloon drop intended to simulate the Martian atmosphere, bringing us one step closer to being the first plane on Mars.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Prandtl-m Deflection Sensors Implementation and Development of Gondola IMU System

BSC-Ursa Minor 92

The Preliminary Research AerodyNamic Design to Land on Mars (PRANDTL-M) is a light-weight glider with a 2.5 ft. span. PRANDTL-M applies the successful research on proverse yaw and rudderless flight of the previous PRANDTL projects to potential flight on Mars. During its flight, PRANDTL-M will collect direct data of the Martian atmosphere and topography, information currently unavailable to NASA. The strict size and weight constraints of the PRANDTL-M require the avionics to be small, powerful, and able to perform at -850 F temperatures. The intent of this internship is to develop, fabricate, integrate and test a position sensor for PRANDTL-M’s control surfaces. This system uses C-based programming, an embedded microcontroller, and a variable resistor to get in-flight data on degree of deflection. This will confirm the successful communication between the servos operating the control surfaces and the flight controller. It will also verify that the elevons are able to hold commanded positions against aerodynamic forces in flight. To prepare for -850 F conditions, PRANDTL-M will undergo three environmental tests to confirm the avionics can withstand low temperatures and pressures. Then, PRANDTL-M will be ready for a 125,000 ft. weather balloon drop intended to simulate the Martian atmosphere, bringing us one step closer to being the first plane on Mars.