Presentation Title

Role of the Cell Wall in Resistance of Bacteria to the Complement System

Faculty Mentor

Ben Aronson

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 53

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The human complement system is a group of serum proteins that destroys foreign bacteria by forming pores in bacterial cell membranes, making the cells osmotically unstable and causing them to lyse. This process works on most bacterial invaders, but some are resistant. Most Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria are resistant, while Gram-negative bacteria tend to be sensitive to complement. This project aimed to determine whether the cell wall plays a role in complement resistance of bacteria. In the course of this work it was discovered that the Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus is human serum-sensitive. However, heat-treatment of the serum indicates that it is not complement killing the cells. The killing agent is not present in bovine serum and seems to be sensitive to high concentrations of NaCl. Future work will attempt to elucidate the factor(s) in human serum that can kill M. luteus.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Role of the Cell Wall in Resistance of Bacteria to the Complement System

BSC-Ursa Minor 53

The human complement system is a group of serum proteins that destroys foreign bacteria by forming pores in bacterial cell membranes, making the cells osmotically unstable and causing them to lyse. This process works on most bacterial invaders, but some are resistant. Most Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria are resistant, while Gram-negative bacteria tend to be sensitive to complement. This project aimed to determine whether the cell wall plays a role in complement resistance of bacteria. In the course of this work it was discovered that the Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus is human serum-sensitive. However, heat-treatment of the serum indicates that it is not complement killing the cells. The killing agent is not present in bovine serum and seems to be sensitive to high concentrations of NaCl. Future work will attempt to elucidate the factor(s) in human serum that can kill M. luteus.