Presentation Title

Self-Perceptions of Social Standing in Adolescence

Faculty Mentor

Andrea Hopmeyer

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 2

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This short-term longitudinal study examined the role that 9th grade students’ (N=284; 155 girls, 123 boys) behavioral reputations had in predicting their self-perceptions of social standing among peers. Self-report instruments were used to assess four dimensions of participants’ social experiences (popularity, being liked, unpopularity, and being disliked) while peer nomination measures assessed behavioral reputations among peers (overtly aggressive, relationally aggressive, overtly victimized, and relationally victimized). Bivariate correlations showed that the four indices of social standing were stable over a 1-year period. Regression analyses demonstrated that while only Time 1 self-perceptions were significant predictors of liking and unpopularity at Time 2, the behavioral reputation variables added incrementally in predicting popularity and disliking. Self-perceived popularity was predicted by high levels of overt aggression and low levels of overt victimization. Self-perceived disliking was predicted by high levels of relational aggression. The latter finding was moderated by gender. Taken together, the results highlight the complex nature of adolescents’ self-perceptions among peers.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Self-Perceptions of Social Standing in Adolescence

BSC-Ursa Minor 2

This short-term longitudinal study examined the role that 9th grade students’ (N=284; 155 girls, 123 boys) behavioral reputations had in predicting their self-perceptions of social standing among peers. Self-report instruments were used to assess four dimensions of participants’ social experiences (popularity, being liked, unpopularity, and being disliked) while peer nomination measures assessed behavioral reputations among peers (overtly aggressive, relationally aggressive, overtly victimized, and relationally victimized). Bivariate correlations showed that the four indices of social standing were stable over a 1-year period. Regression analyses demonstrated that while only Time 1 self-perceptions were significant predictors of liking and unpopularity at Time 2, the behavioral reputation variables added incrementally in predicting popularity and disliking. Self-perceived popularity was predicted by high levels of overt aggression and low levels of overt victimization. Self-perceived disliking was predicted by high levels of relational aggression. The latter finding was moderated by gender. Taken together, the results highlight the complex nature of adolescents’ self-perceptions among peers.