Presentation Title

Solid Model Design and Fabrication for Prandtl-m

Faculty Mentor

David Berger

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 78

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars (PRANDTL-M) is a flying wing design that utilizes an airfoil inspired by Ludwig Prandtl. This airfoil has a twisted wing which produces upwash at the wingtips and therefore proverse yaw. This innovative and complex design increases the stability of the plane and eliminates the need for a tail. Also the stable and streamlined nature of the airfoil allows for flight at very low Reynolds numbers of approximately 20,000 which are reasonably attainable for subsonic flight in the low density atmosphere of Mars. Consistent and complete testing has been undertaken using multiple airframes which utilize foam, each with various avionics. As foam is not durable over long time scales and rigorous flight testing there is a need for repeatable and robust airframes with consistent avionics placement. The primary task of this work is to adapt a current SolidWorks model, to the needs of a machine to produce an airframe mold. This mold will be used to produce a robust-consistent airframe for flight testing and integration of control systems, avionics, and relevant hardware. The mold and associated airframe process will be used to produce multiple airframes allowing for optimization of control systems design. In addition to the airframe design process, a SolidWorks model has been adapted to a 3-D print process that enables us to size electronics inside a realistic model of the avionics bay and provides for more accurate integration of the electronics. The combination of these resources aims to produce a streamlined process for design and fabrication of the PRANDTL-M.

Summary of research results to be presented

The Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars (PRANDTL-M) is a flying wing design that utilizes a spanwise lift distribution inspired by Ludwig Prandtl. This wing is twisted in such a way that it produces upwash at the wingtips and therefore proverse yaw. This innovative and complex design increases the stability of the plane and eliminates the need for a tail. Also the stable and streamlined nature of the airfoil allows for flight at very low Reynolds numbers of approximately 20,000 which are reasonably attainable for subsonic flight in the low density atmosphere of Mars.

Using a previous SolidWorks model of the current PM design allowed for a starting point for this work. The previous model was edited so that a 3D printable test section of PM could be produced. This allowed new avionics to be sized without having to use a full scale plane. In addition the model was also adapted so that a female mold could be produced using a 5-axis CNC machine.

The production of this mold allows for consistent composite planes to be produced with precision and low production costs. As new planes are quickly produced, multiple flight systems--which include, avionics, servos, and flight computers can be tested with relative ease and platform robustness. This production method is both low cost and very durable as the mold is very robust.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Solid Model Design and Fabrication for Prandtl-m

BSC-Ursa Minor 78

The Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars (PRANDTL-M) is a flying wing design that utilizes an airfoil inspired by Ludwig Prandtl. This airfoil has a twisted wing which produces upwash at the wingtips and therefore proverse yaw. This innovative and complex design increases the stability of the plane and eliminates the need for a tail. Also the stable and streamlined nature of the airfoil allows for flight at very low Reynolds numbers of approximately 20,000 which are reasonably attainable for subsonic flight in the low density atmosphere of Mars. Consistent and complete testing has been undertaken using multiple airframes which utilize foam, each with various avionics. As foam is not durable over long time scales and rigorous flight testing there is a need for repeatable and robust airframes with consistent avionics placement. The primary task of this work is to adapt a current SolidWorks model, to the needs of a machine to produce an airframe mold. This mold will be used to produce a robust-consistent airframe for flight testing and integration of control systems, avionics, and relevant hardware. The mold and associated airframe process will be used to produce multiple airframes allowing for optimization of control systems design. In addition to the airframe design process, a SolidWorks model has been adapted to a 3-D print process that enables us to size electronics inside a realistic model of the avionics bay and provides for more accurate integration of the electronics. The combination of these resources aims to produce a streamlined process for design and fabrication of the PRANDTL-M.