Presentation Title

Airfoil Pressure Difference through a Wind Tunnel

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Nader Saniei

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 72

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

  1. Bernoulli's Principle states that the pressure of a fluid decreases at points where the speed of the fluid increases. Bernoulli’s Principle is applied in generating lift for the airfoils of aircrafts. An airfoil is a structure with curved surfaces, used as the basic form of wings and as the horizontal stabilizer of most aircrafts. It is designed to give the most favorable lift to drag ratio during flight. The development of airfoils began in the late 1800s with the idea that adding curvature on blades would efficiently produce more lift than without curvature. Airfoils were designed to increase the velocity of the airflow on the top surface, thus decreasing pressure. Simultaneously, the impact of the air on the lower surface of the airfoil increases the pressure. The combination of pressure decrease above and pressure increase below produces lift. Airfoils are tested in wind tunnels, which are tools used in aerodynamic research to study the effects of air moving past solid objects. The following research calibrated an 18-inch recirculating wind tunnel relating the wind speed to the frequency, and analyzed various points for pressure differences over a low speed airfoil. The low speed airfoil had 18 pressure tap locations, measured from the leading edge to the tap per cord length in the x and y direction. The calculated velocity from a given frequency was found to yield similar values to what the manufacturer produced for the wind tunnel. Similarly, after multiple trials at different frequencies, the pressure distribution was found to yield similar values to what previous research has suggested. The lower surface of an airfoil should have a higher pressure than the upper surface due to the curvature, the wind’s angle of attack, and the surface area.

Summary of research results to be presented

The calculated velocity from a given frequency was found to be close to the values the manufacturer gave for the wind tunnel. After multiple trial runs at different frequencies, the pressure distribution was found to yield similar values to what previous research has suggested. The lower surface of an airfoil should have a higher pressure than the upper surface due to the curvature, the wind’s angle of attack, and the surface area. In the future, different angles of attacks will be analyzed while changing the frequency to various values. The temperature will not be held at constant to compare to when the values are naturally changing during the experiment. Different pressure taps will be compared to other taps on the airfoil to see differences in the location at different curvatures.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Airfoil Pressure Difference through a Wind Tunnel

BSC-Ursa Minor 72

  1. Bernoulli's Principle states that the pressure of a fluid decreases at points where the speed of the fluid increases. Bernoulli’s Principle is applied in generating lift for the airfoils of aircrafts. An airfoil is a structure with curved surfaces, used as the basic form of wings and as the horizontal stabilizer of most aircrafts. It is designed to give the most favorable lift to drag ratio during flight. The development of airfoils began in the late 1800s with the idea that adding curvature on blades would efficiently produce more lift than without curvature. Airfoils were designed to increase the velocity of the airflow on the top surface, thus decreasing pressure. Simultaneously, the impact of the air on the lower surface of the airfoil increases the pressure. The combination of pressure decrease above and pressure increase below produces lift. Airfoils are tested in wind tunnels, which are tools used in aerodynamic research to study the effects of air moving past solid objects. The following research calibrated an 18-inch recirculating wind tunnel relating the wind speed to the frequency, and analyzed various points for pressure differences over a low speed airfoil. The low speed airfoil had 18 pressure tap locations, measured from the leading edge to the tap per cord length in the x and y direction. The calculated velocity from a given frequency was found to yield similar values to what the manufacturer produced for the wind tunnel. Similarly, after multiple trials at different frequencies, the pressure distribution was found to yield similar values to what previous research has suggested. The lower surface of an airfoil should have a higher pressure than the upper surface due to the curvature, the wind’s angle of attack, and the surface area.