Presentation Title

The Effect of Spices on Cancer Incidence in Peru

Faculty Mentor

Roberts, Deprele, Nogaj

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 13

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Breast and cervical cancer are a major concern for women all throughout the globe. Statistically, over the last 30 years, there has been an increased incidence of breast (3.1%) and cervical cancer (0.6%) worldwide (WHO). Nutrition, natural remedies, and lifestyles of the Peruvian women were explored in an attempt to understand the effect nutrition and natural remedies have on women’s health. It can be argued that nutrition plays a large role in the overall health of a person, therefore supplements, food, and spices may affect the frequency of cancer amongst Peruvian women. Patients and community members around Cusco, Peru were interviewed about their health, diets, and cooking habits. Using survey methods we focused mainly on spices since they have been known to preserve medicinal compounds. In analyzing the data from the responses about spice usage, it is clear that most spices used in the tested population are derived from common protein sources and vegetables. The data showed that 5 people got their spices from meat (protein), which means that the protein was processed to be made into a broth or a dried additive. 17 people mentioned vegetables such as garlic, onions, parsley, tomatoes, olives, and peppers. 8 people discussed oregano as one of their most useful spice. Based on the collected survey results, oregano and other commonly used spices will be extracted and tested for their effect on mammalian cells. Following, an MTT and cytotoxicity assays that will help us understand the role these compounds play on mammalian cell viability.

Summary of research results to be presented

The data showed that 5 people got their spices from meat (protein), which means that the protein was processed to be made into a broth or a dried additive. 17 people mentioned vegetables such as garlic, onions, parsley, tomatoes, olives, and peppers. 8 people discussed oregano as one of their most useful spice. Based on the collected survey results, oregano and other commonly used spices will be extracted and tested for their effect on mammalian cells.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

The Effect of Spices on Cancer Incidence in Peru

BSC-Ursa Minor 13

Breast and cervical cancer are a major concern for women all throughout the globe. Statistically, over the last 30 years, there has been an increased incidence of breast (3.1%) and cervical cancer (0.6%) worldwide (WHO). Nutrition, natural remedies, and lifestyles of the Peruvian women were explored in an attempt to understand the effect nutrition and natural remedies have on women’s health. It can be argued that nutrition plays a large role in the overall health of a person, therefore supplements, food, and spices may affect the frequency of cancer amongst Peruvian women. Patients and community members around Cusco, Peru were interviewed about their health, diets, and cooking habits. Using survey methods we focused mainly on spices since they have been known to preserve medicinal compounds. In analyzing the data from the responses about spice usage, it is clear that most spices used in the tested population are derived from common protein sources and vegetables. The data showed that 5 people got their spices from meat (protein), which means that the protein was processed to be made into a broth or a dried additive. 17 people mentioned vegetables such as garlic, onions, parsley, tomatoes, olives, and peppers. 8 people discussed oregano as one of their most useful spice. Based on the collected survey results, oregano and other commonly used spices will be extracted and tested for their effect on mammalian cells. Following, an MTT and cytotoxicity assays that will help us understand the role these compounds play on mammalian cell viability.